Tag Archive | "student life"

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Bridging the Gap Between International Friendships


Despite the huge number of international students on campus, many local students said that they don’t have international friends. At the same time, many international students complained that they can’t make American friends either.

Why do two birds in the same cage stay on their own side when they both want to meet each other?

“I always thought that is because (international students)  are new to the country and want to grab onto what’s familiar,” said Teaching Assistant Jenna Pratt.

In the Stone Age, even earlier, people lived in groups. Do we initially tend to communicate and live with individuals who are similar to us?

The “popular girls” group in high school, “muscle men” in the gym, even the geese flock together in the sky.

There are advantages to being together with people who are similar to you. Some girls might feel inferior when they are around beauties; some guys cannot hold the barbells of “muscles”; a sparrow cannot fly with a goose because it has no chance of enduring such a long trip.

It is not because either one is better or worse. It’s because they are different. One must get over their differences in order to meet different people.

Language is the first stone in the way of communication. Research shows that in the first two years, most international students are still struggling with communicating in English.

“I think it has to go both ways,” said Joyce Meier, a writing professor at Michigan State University. “Sometimes American students don’t welcome fully the international students because sometimes they tend to be friends with each other, they went to highschool together, they know each other already, so they form their group very tight, and so it’s hard for someone from another culture to become their friends.”

When asked how he chose the seat in a big class, a student said that if there is someone he knows, he would definitely sit next to that person.

The response was the same for both American and international students, which seems to have only broadened the distance between new classmates.

When students were asked, “Will you talk first to the person sitting next to you or you will wait for him?” most people said wait.

“Sometimes I am not confident enough to talk to others, and I am always afraid of misunderstanding others because of the language,” said Yuxi Fan.

International Advisor Joy Walter said it’s a crucial step for all students to reach beyond cultural boundaries and that doing so can increase enjoyment of their college relationships.

“It’s important to know people who are different from you and to know the whole campus. Some students maybe not understand that,” said Walter. “It brings more values to your MSU experience if you do know some people from other countries.”

This campus is like a small world, every single individual has the opportunity to connect and exchange ideas with each other.

Meier said that it isn’t just language that we use to communicate. Sports, clubs or activities are often a good way to break the ice as well.

“For international students, they need to be brave and are willing to do something that might make them uncomfortable, start a conversation, approach someone they don’t know,” said Walter. “Not be embarrassed about what your English sounds like or think too much about it.”

Victor Wang said that he has a lot of different friends and that he doesn’t let the language barrier stop him from meeting others.

“I love new things and friends, that’s why I always be the first one to talk wherever I am. I am trying to take part in any activity I know and to communicate with people. Most people are much nicer than I thought,” said Wang.

On the way to meet different friends or on the way to reach the other bird in the same cage, Joy Walter said we have to push ourselves more.

“Try something and see how it goes,” said Walter. “Most time it would go much better than you probably think in your head. ”

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Students get a ready for a summer of music

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Students get a ready for a summer of music


Every year, college students flock to amphitheaters, concert halls and theaters for a round of annual summer concerts.  With the warm summer wind crawling through the air and the carefree relaxation of the season dominating, artists invade cities melting with summer heat annually, selling out summer tours and festivals such as Bonnaroo, Summer Camp, Lollapalooza and Faster Horses Festival.

While the Wharton has plenty of concerts to see this summer, students are going beyond Michigan to see their favorite acts. Photo credit: Julia Grippe

“Summer concerts appear to be special because you are not only paying to hear an artist you enjoy, but you’re paying for the atmosphere,” said Lindsay Shafer, an education sophomore.  “I believe outdoor summer concerts and festivals are becoming more popular because they offer more than just a show.”

Since one of the most famous summer music festivals in 1969, Woodstock, festivals such as Lollapalooza (established in 1991) and Bonnaroo (established in 2002) have toured the United States with a treasure trove of varying musical acts each year.  These acts include hip-hop, rock, pop and even comedy troupes.

“This summer I will be going to Summer Camp,” said Kevin Smith, a media arts and information and communications junior. Summer Camp is a music festival in Chillicothe, Illinois.

Summer Camp sets up shop every Memorial Day Weekend.  At the festival, a variety of activities are also held. There are centers for children called Kids Camp, which allow children to be attended to during the concerts, as well as a family-friendly area in which most adults and children participate.

Since 2001, Summer Camp has expanded to more than 15,000 attendees, while hosting more than 100 bands on their seven stages over a period of three days.  This year’s headliners include Moe., Umphrey’s McGee, and the Trey Anastasio Band.  For the full lineup, see http://summercampfestival.com/lineup/.

“At many festivals there are extra activities, campgrounds, chances to meet people and an opportunity to see more than one artist,” said Shafer.  “I also think it has become a lifestyle for many people our age.  Going from festival to festival with a group of friends makes for a very exciting summer.”

For many college students, music festivals are the time to let their hair down, not shower for a few days and live as if there is no future or past.  With a warm breeze and cold refreshment, summer festivals may seem like a type of paradise.

Another popular music festival is Faster Horses, being held July 19, 20 and 21 in Brooklyn, Michigan.  This country music festival headlines with some of country music’s most famous names, including Jason Aldean and Luke Bryan.

At Faster Horses, audiences are able to camp in the “rolling Irish hills” of Michigan while enjoying some of their favorite country musical acts.  This year, the show is being dubbed the “three-day hillbilly sleepover.”

Not only are music festivals popular during the summer season, but also regular music tours.

“So far I’m going to see Grizzly Bear and The XX at The Fillmore in Detroit on June 12, and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros at the Kalamazoo State Theatre on June 24,” said Amanda Heckenkamp, a sociology freshman.  “Any concert is special, regardless of the season, because there is absolutely nothing better than being able to support someone in what they love to do, and love the art that they are creating at the same time.”

Like Heckenkamp, Shafer expects to see some of her favorite bands in the warm and relaxed days of summer this season, including The Lumineers and Cold War Kids.

“Summer concerts are popular because it’s one of the few times of the year where you can fully enjoy them, meaning you don’t have to worry about classes,” said Smith.  “But more importantly, they create a distinct memory for that summer that will stand out from the rest.”

Heckenkamp agreed with Smith on this.

“Summer concerts are so popular because there is more time to be able to attend them and more time to have fun,” she said. “Summer concerts have a different vibe.  Regardless of the artist, the shows seem to be a little more upbeat and everybody’s feeling good and are more carefree.”

For a complete list of upcoming concert dates and ticket information in Michigan, check out: http://www.miconcerts.com.

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Zombie Culture

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Zombie Culture


By Emily Green

Zombies, although not literally, have been sweeping the nation, with movies like Zombieland and television shows like The Walking Dead. With the zombie fever heating up, a new game Humans v Zombies, or HvZ as the players call, has emerged across the world at over 650 colleges and universities.

HvZ is essentially a game of tag. All of the players start the game as humans and one player is randomly chosen to be the original zombie. This original zombie then has to tag the human players and turn them into zombies. The game is won when either the zombies have turned all the human players into zombies or when the humans survive long enough for all the zombies to starve, which is when a zombie does not tag a human within forty-eight hours.

“There really isn’t anything more appealing then running around a beautiful campus like MSU’s, shooting NERF guns at other people. It just sounded like so much fun,” humanities pre-law sophomore Ben Burroughs said when speaking of why he decided to be a part of the HvZ game.

Photo credit: humansvszombies.org

A few of the basic things to know about HvZ are that humans must wear a bandana around their arm to identify themselves as humans in the game. When the players are turned into zombies, they must transfer the bandana to their heads.  Players are turned into zombies by getting tagged by an existing zombie in the game; after they are tagged they have now become an official member of the zombie team. The human players of the game are the ones who are waking around with the NERF guns.  They have these guns so they can stun the zombies for fifteen minutes by blasting them with the dart guns. This means that the zombies cannot interact in the game in anyway until those fifteen minutes are up.

With the undead roaming the streets of MSU’s campus, the humans are on the lookout, NERF guns held high in anticipation for a zombie attack. The HvZ game has really taken off and many students have joined in on the fun.

“I absolutely enjoy playing it, and I will most likely play until I graduate. It makes going to class and hanging out on campus a thousand times more fun,” said Burroughs.

HvZ has become very popular on campus. When the game is going on you can count on seeing a multitude of students running around campus wearing their bandanas with pride.

“My favorite part would have to be the thrill of walking to class, looking over your shoulder every few steps, feeling completely paranoid that a zombie could jump out at you any second, and then the rush when you survive an attack is amazing,” said Burroughs.

HvZ has made such a huge impact on the students and the culture at Michigan State that even the staff at MSU realizes how popular this zombie epidemic is by offering a zombie-themed class in the Social Work Department, entitled “Surviving the Coming Zombie Apocalypse: Catastrophes & Human Behavior.” Along with classes about zombies there are many other activities and projects on campus that are incorporating zombies into them.

One of these projects would include the student film titled Apocalypse Theory, which is about the end of the world at MSU. This film was made by brothers and MSU students Brandon and Cameron Laventure. Together they decided to incorporate a scene with students playing HvZ into it.

“[HvZ] is a really interesting bit of culture we have at MSU. It gives campus its own unique life. Even if you are not a part of the game you are aware of the game and experience a part of it [just] by watching it,” said Brandon, who graduated from MSU in 2010.

The two brothers thought that including this scene in the film would bring a more personal feel to the film and be more relatable to the students, since this game is actually played here on our campus.

This craze has gone beyond being just for the students here at MSU; Troy Hale has recognized how popular zombies are in our culture and the entertainment industry right now and has decided to make a documentary film on the topic.

“Like anything, [zombies are] the current fad. A few years ago it was all about vampires, now its zombies.  Entertainment follows what people are currently interested in and vice-versa. Many shows are being made right now. The popularity and success of those shows create even more shows,” said Academic Specialist and Big Ten Network Coordinator Troy Hale.

Hale does not seem to think that this zombie mania will last long saying like everything, it has its life cycle. Something “new” will come along and interests will change. It will lose popularity and probably come back again in 50 years.

“It’s an interesting topic. People have a lot of interest in the topic so it’s the right time to make a documentary about it. Kevin Epling and I started to chat about all the interesting things going on around the topic of zombies. It’s an exciting thing to talk about so we started compiling interesting angles that we could cover in a documentary,” said Hale.

We see can see through the entertainment industry and the games that we play that zombies have truly taken over the world for the moment in a matter of speaking. Besides for HvZ being a part of the zombie craze right now, it is also a game of fun and excitement. It is a nice break for the students involved and even for those students who are just spectators between classes to take a small pause from constantly thinking about school work and focus on the game.

“Yes I would recommend the game to other students; it’s the novelty of embracing a childhood toy, combined with the fun and skills of being a college student. Not to mention the more people that play, the better,” said Burroughs.

With players as excited as this to share the game with as many students as possible makes it easier to see why this game is becoming so popular and many more students keep joining every year.

If you want to learn even more about HvZ, the official website is http://humansvszombies.org where you can find a more in-depth account of all the rules, as well as interesting facts and information about the game, including how the game was invented.

 

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Teach Me How to Zumba!

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Teach Me How to Zumba!


By Alex Tekip

As a spring breeze starts to pick up and scents of flower blossoms and freshly cut grass fill the air and the year begins to dwindle to a close, it becomes increasingly difficult for the average Michigan State student to focus on their studies as well as maintain healthy lifestyle habits, including a daily workout. It’s guaranteed that with finals just around the corner, and “stress food” abundant everywhere, most students will find the task of being healthy at the bottom of their priority list. However, this task is becoming easier thanks to a fitness phenomenon that is taking campus by storm: Zumba.

Zumba is a Latin dance fitness class that has not only developed a strong following at Michigan State, but also worldwide. According to the official Zumba Fitness website, more than 12 million people across 125 countries in 110,000 locations participate in Zumba.

One of these participants is comparative cultures and politics sophomore Adam Harrison, who is also a certified Zumba instructor.  Harrison enjoys the fast-paced nature of Zumba and sees it as a fun way to work out in a loose environment.

Photo credit: Alex Tekip

“When I participate in Zumba, whether it be instructing or in a class, I don’t realize that I’m sweating until the end. It’s a fun way to let your body go wild while shaking it to good music,” Harrison said.

Harrison received his Zumba certification underneath the guidance of fellow instructor, applied engineering and science sophomore Robin Lawson. Both individuals enjoy teaching classes and sharing their passion for fitness and dance with their students.

Lawson has been a dancer since age eight, and started taking Zumba classes as a freshman. She instantly fell in love with the high-energy aura and dual nature of Zumba, and immediately approached instructors, asking for recommendations and guidance to change her position from the many being taught by one, to the one teaching many.

“Performing is something I’ve been doing for a very long time, and in a way, instructing Zumba is on the same level, only I can directly see the reaction of my audience, and I can watch as the let go and begin to feel the music,” Lawson said.

Harrison started attending Zumba classes as a freshman as well, and started officially teaching classes in February. He makes up the less than 5 percent of male Zumba instructors within 75 miles; lack of male representation was a major reason he wanted to be an instructor.

“Zumba has helped me achieve a healthier lifestyle, and I wanted more male representation within the classes at MSU, for men to know that the gym isn’t the only place to go work out,” Harrison said.

Human biology freshman Jaime Cloyd has attended classes taught by Lawson and Harrison. Cloyd has an avid interest in fitness and nutrition and sees Zumba as an easy way to stay healthy with her busy lifestyle, or get in a workout on days where she doesn’t have the motivation to go to the gym.

“The free Zumba classes offered in Brody are convenient to go to because they are close to home and don’t take much time.”

Cloyd also enjoys the social aspect of Zumba classes, often participating in Zumba with her floor mates, including her roommate, junior zoo and aquarium science major Laura Boelema.

“[Boelema] and I go once or twice a week to take a break from studying to get in exercise and meet new people,” Cloyd said.

Cloyd and Boelema are only a small part of the workout dance party. Zumba classes at MSU can range in attendance from ten people to over 100.

“Zumba is basically a big party.  The goal is to have too much fun that you forget you’re working out,” said Lawson.

Many Zumba participants do not realize that while dancing to a fusion of Latin, International, and current Pop music, they are undergoing interval fitness training, and toning their body while shimmying and shaking, moving around almost as if they were at a workout dance club.

“Since the audience for Zumba classes is within the age range of seventeen to twenty-four, I use club-inspired moves in my routines,” said Harrison. “The choreography is flexible and people can keep up easily…they leave feeling healthy and accomplished.”

Boelema describes the post-Zumba experience as one of rejuvenation.

“After Zumba I feel healthier and more energized,” she said

The feeling of having accomplished a solid workout in such a quick and easy manner is the major force of attraction propelling Spartans to attend Zumba classes, to stray away from the end-of-the year, finals-induced stress and distractions, and monotonous nature of the gym, to stay in step when it comes to being healthy.

“Zumba is not intimidating, it’s always changing, there’s fun routines, fun music, and friends,” said Harrison. “What is there not to love?”

Zumba Classes are free for MSU students with a group fitness pass, and $3 for all others. Check out your neighborhood news bulletins and the MSU rec sports website for more information.

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Inside MSU’s Headphones: April

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Inside MSU’s Headphones: April


You know the saying, “April showers brings new, interesting music.” That’s not it? Okay, well this month we heard a lot of new songs, a lot of old songs, and again, more Lady Gaga and Wiz Khalifa. Yet with the sun shining on this particular day of surveying students, we got PLENTY of songs from your fellow Spartans.

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People Who Do Stuff: Joel Ruffin, Jr.

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People Who Do Stuff: Joel Ruffin, Jr.


By Maddie Fetchiet

Joel Ruffin Jr., founder of the organization People Who Do Stuff, is a go-getter.

Founder of People Who Do Stuff

As of March 14, 2012, the organization was officially recognized as a registered student organization at Michigan State University.

On a campus of nearly 50,000 students the significance of the individual often gets lost in the masses, but Ruffin Jr. was determined to make the power of the each and every Spartan felt at MSU.

“People Who Do Stuff is an organization that realizes the power of the individual, and recognizes the ever-growing demand for the individual to exercise that inherent autonomy of power for the creation of programs and resources that will help develop and advance their community,” Ruffin Jr. said. “We strive to empower the individual to become the change they wish to see in the world.”

The organization serves as a platform that connects people to resources that can help them make a difference in their communities. Ruffin Jr. calls it “an organization that will move and change the world.”

Through the efforts of Ruffin. Jr. along with faculty and staff at MSU, People Who Do Stuff hopes to gain local, nation and possibly international attention as the organization grows. MSU students, state administration and MSU faculty have contributed to building and co-founding the organization, according to Ruffin Jr.

Ruffin Jr. saw the need for People Who Do Stuff when he noticed how difficult it was for students to make a difference in their community without being a part of registered student organization. The organization seeks to provide the means for any student to start their own organization.

People Who Do Stuff provides space for programming, training in branding programs and leadership styles, and helps partner students with alumni and professionals that want to help students achieve their goals.

“We are an organization that gives the power back to the individual, we’ll do that with an inclusive community that will help support that individual’s goals and dreams as well,” Ruffin Jr. said.

As the economic hardships prevails, Ruffin Jr. reminds us how important it is to close the gap between Main Street and Wall Street. But he says when people are aware of the resources right in their own communities; the discrepancy between capitalism and democracy can be reconciled.

Ruffin Jr. sees People Who Do Stuff as a “new model of a community,” and with his entrepreneurial spirit, he hopes to see his organization team up with similar movements around the nation to become one giant resource for individuals striving to make a difference.

As Ruffin Jr. prepares for graduation this May, he hopes his organization will involve enough MSU and community members that his legacy will live on. The psychology senior plans to stay heavily involved with the development and expansion of People Who Do Stuff, with an ultimate goal of turning it into a non-profit organization. Ruffin believes with an innovative team of workers, he can help lead this organization to reach his goals.

“People Who Do Stuff is going to be huge because people who want to do stuff exist all over the world, and once we get together, there’s nothing we can’t do,” Ruffin Jr. Said.

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Dancing with the Spartans: MSU’s Own Ballroom Dancing

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Dancing with the Spartans: MSU’s Own Ballroom Dancing


By Emily Green

Dancing with the Stars isn’t the only hot spot for competitive ballroom dancing. Ballroom Dance Club/Competitive Ballroom Dance Team here at Michigan State University has room for plenty of dancers from novice to expert.

The Ballroom Dance Club has been around since the 1980s and is mainly focused on providing inexpensive dance lessons to the community. These lessons are held on Sunday afternoons throughout the school year on campus at Demonstration Hall.

“The Sunday lessons are taught by a professional couple while there are student captains who are [also] student captains appointed to help teach,” said Secretary/Public Relations and zoology junior Sarah LoPresto.

Photo credit: Jill Hakala

While the club has been around since the ’80s, the Competitive Ballroom Dance Team, which is connected with the Ballroom Dance Club, just started recently in 2009. This aspect of the team brings a more aggressive and creative feel to the club because students get to actually compete and show off their dancing skills instead of just constantly practicing them.

“For the competitive dances all colleges [who have a Competitive Ballroom Dance Teams] train for collegiate competitions,” LoPresto said.

Some of the competitions that they attend are the Ohio Star Ball Competition, which takes place in November and the Ohio State University Competition that takes place in April. When the members of the Ballroom Dance Team compete they have to dance with other members on the team as their partners.

“It is very important that the students pick their own partners and we don’t assign them,” LoPresto said.

This is because dancers must have good chemistry with their partners in order to perform well in their dances. Due to this fact and the lower membership of men on the team, some of the guys may have up to two or three partners. Because of this, the team is especially in need for new male members.

“Anyone can join the [competitive] team there are two levels. If you want to be on level two then you do need to audition, but there are no cuts,” LoPresto said.

The team is always open to new members and anyone is welcome to join.

Before the dancing part of the competitions begins there are some guidelines that the members must remember and need to follow before they can begin competing. While there are no set rules on the dress code for the dancers at the competitions, the members usually try to wear dressier clothes.

“The guys wear all black and the girls wear heels and dresses. Nothing like all the fancy costumes you see on Dancing with the Stars,” LoPresto said.

Along with the dress code there are also specific dances and techniques that the dancers need to know.

“We have a dance syllabus that tells us what dances to do and different moves and skills within the dances,” LoPresto said.

After the team figures out what dances they are doing for the competition, they begin practicing for the day when they get to show off their dancing skills and techniques in the competition.

“Everyone on the team competes at the competitions, there are just different levels in [each] competition. Bronze, which is the lowest level, then silver, and finally gold. In the gold level there is more technique,” LoPresto said.

The members who are a part of the bronze group at first shouldn’t get discouraged according to LoPresto because you can move up in categories based on your skill level and number of years on the team.

Photo credit: Jill Hakala

SPREADING THE WORD

For just starting in 2009 the Competitive Ballroom Dancing Team has done a good job with getting the word out about their club, in a variety of different ways. Some of the existing members on the Ballroom Dance Team were introduced to it through their friends or by fellow members on the Ballroom Dance Team.

“I have been dancing forever and when my friend told me about it, I went. I love it, it is like home,” said English junior Kaitlyn Hlywa.

Additionally some team members happened to come across the Ballroom Team on their own. Several people found out about it from the Michigan State’s student life web page that lists all the clubs at MSU while other members heard about it at Sparticipation when the Ballroom Dance Team had a spot there to recruit new team members.

“I wanted to keep dancing after high school, [then] I heard about the club through their booth at Sparticipation and wanted to try out ballroom dancing,” said accounting sophomore Ashley Wood, a member for two years now.

The members of the Competitive Ballroom Dance Team are very passionate about dancing and each other as a team, many see the team as being as close as family.

“My favorite part of the team is the bonding experience. [The team] is more about fun, it is like a family,” Hlywa said.

“I love that the team is one big family and when we all hang out together. I also love midnight breakfasts with the team. [Everyone] makes me feel welcome,” said studio art junior Jill Hakala.

If you are at all interested in joining the competitive ballroom dance team or in taking lessons from them the best way to contact the team is through their website www.msu.edu/-ballroom. If you would rather have a firsthand look at the club instead, then go Thursday nights when the competitive team holds an open practice which is more of social and informal practice from ten to midnight in Demonstration Hall.

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Rough Saturday Night? The Day-After Solutions

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Rough Saturday Night? The Day-After Solutions


By Lauren Walsh

It seems like you’ve been asleep for days. Waking up on a Sunday morning in your own bed is an admirable achievement and waking up somewhere else is well, surprisingly standard. Although waking up in a foreign place such as your sister’s front yard or best friend’s bed may be typical, it’s foremost unfortunate. Waking up not remembering or regretting what happened the night before leaves an aching feeling of discomfort along with a throbbing headache which acts as a constant reminder of “wtf did I do last night?” In these circumstances, vitamins and fluids may cure the physical aspects of a hangover, but the emotional damage is left untreated and therefore requires immediate remedies.  The following five solutions may help relieve that lingering doubt:

(sxc.hu)

1. Phone a friend, find out what happened. When waking up the next morning having no recollection of the night before, the best way to actually get over it is to first find out what happened. Hopefully those questions will be directed towards friends rather than parents, because there are just some things parents shouldn’t know. Getting the facts of what happened the night before alleviates that sense of anxiety and allows you to learn things about yourself that you thought you were incapable of. Such as taking ten shots of tequila or doing a headstand on the kitchen table. Among these remarkable breakthroughs, you might also discover some downsides of last night such as your wallet being missing or that you broke up with your partner after two years of dating. Regardless if the news is bad, any news at all is good news, and that’s why it’s crucial to find out what happened.

2. Check your inventory; make sure you even have a phone to be able to call that friend. When the events of last night unfold, it’s vital to check every pocket, purse, room, and car to make sure that you have your three essentials: wallet, keys, and phone. These items will not only alleviate that hangover stress but will provide a sense of truth to that feeling of uncertainty. Such as you may wonder why you only have two dollars in your wallet after a fifty withdrawal from the bank. Well, my friend, you may have been very friendly last night and bought your friends (or even strangers) several rounds of drinks. Even though you are now broke, look at the plus side, you have random new numbers in your phone and are ultimately a very giving person, so I applaud you. Also, among those new numbers, you may find those seven digits from that girl or guy that you chatted up to last night. This may be a complete exaggeration but calling strangers never hurt anyone. Nevertheless, having those belongings will help cure that emotional damage of a hangover.

3. Apologize, if necessary. After finding your phone, or commendably having it all along, use it to call anyone that you may have injured or insulted last night. Whether you drunk dialed or ran into your ex-boyfriend and called him an asshole or punched someone in the face because you felt like it, an apology is obligatory. For many people, saying “I am sorry” is like facing the death penalty, but if you know or find that you did wrong to others, be that honest Spartan I know you can be and man up to your mistakes. Not only will this help resolve any issues between you and that person, but will help clear that guilty conscious from last night’s calamities.

4. Do penance. If the apology to your friend didn’t suffice then taking them out to lunch or doing their laundry may get you one step closer to forgiveness. You know this always worked when you got into trouble with your parents, so make up for those mistakes by spoiling your friend a little. If a self-directed apology is necessary because you feel so ashamed of your actions or abuse of alcohol, then go do something for yourself. For example, if you drank too much and decided to shave only part of your head because it was hot outside (unlikely in this Michigan weather), go get a real haircut and maybe a massage while you’re at it. If you drunkenly decided to buy the taco twelve pack from Taco Bell at three AM and felt guilty about it in the morning then go for a run or lift some weights. These resolutions will offer a sense of comfort from the emotional damage of that Saturday night.

5. Get over it, and pretend it didn’t happen. So you worked really hard in trying to remember and find out what happened last night, now try and forget it. After making sure you have your entire inventory, apologized to yourself and others for being a complete waste of existence, and making up for it, now try to forget everything that happened. Don’t confuse forgetting those events from not learning from your mistakes. If you portray yourself as that obnoxious drunk, not only will you continue to have these regrettable hangovers and sense of insecurity, but no one will want to hang out with you.  Even though these five steps along with fluids and vitamins may cure that Saturday night disaster, be honest with yourself and recognize that it’s probably going to happen again. So, if none of these five steps work, slap yourself a little and grab a cocktail.

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Spartans Salute Japanese Culture

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Spartans Salute Japanese Culture


By Rebecca Nelson

The Asian Studies Center at Michigan State University will be tipping its hat to Japanese culture throughout the month.  The celebration will include a series of events that have been carefully planned out by students in the hospitality business class at MSU.  Although the campus-wide recognition of Japan has been an annual occurrence for decades, this is the first year of a month-long festivity.

“Our hope is that by focusing on a region for an entire month, we can provide a wide range of activities that will appeal to a diverse group of people. We hope that we have put together a program that has something for everyone,” explained Leslie Jablonski, coordinator of the Asian Studies Center.

The events began with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Monday, Feb. 27, to announce “The Dolls of Japan: Shapes of Prayer, Embodiments of Love,” which will be displayed in the International Center Lobby until the end of the month.

The film "Ran" was screened in honor of Japan Month on Wednesday, March 14.

The travelling exhibit showcases more than 70 representative dolls from Japan including Girls’ Festival dolls and Boys’ Day dolls, dolls associated with performing arts, regional dolls from throughout the country and “creative dolls” made by Japanese craftsman.

“They reflect the customs of Japan and have regionally distinctive attributions,” Jablonski said. “These dolls are more than toys; they tell the story of the Japanese people, their history and their aspirations. This exhibit has been a truly wonderful opportunity for us; we’ve already seen a great deal of interest in it, and the fact that it can be viewed by anyone, at any time, is such a bonus.”

The opening ceremony also featured a keynote from Kuninori Matsuda, Consul General of Japan in Detroit, as well as a presentation by professor Ethan Segal that commemorated the year of challenges that have faced Japan since the tsunami in March of last year.

“We wanted the opportunity to remember the devastating events of March 11th, 2011 in Japan. So, hosting Japan Month during March was perfect,” Jablonski said.

Also occurring in honor of Japan Month is the highly anticipated 19th Annual Michigan Japanese Quiz Bowl.  Japanese students in grades K-12 will compete in a quiz-show style competition, allowing students to exercise their knowledge of spoken and written Japanese language and culture.  Since its start almost 20 years ago, the Michigan Japanese Quiz Bowl has grown into quite the competitive occasion, complete with a final awards ceremony.

Jablonski explained, “The goal of the Asian Studies Center is to promote education of Asia topics at Michigan State and across the Lansing Community.  We hope to provide opportunities that allow individuals to partake in cultural exchanges, giving them the chance to learn something that perhaps they didn’t know.”

“One of the reasons that I wanted to attend MSU was for the cultural experience,” said MSU grad Colleen Keehn. “Coming from a small town, I missed out on that and I think it’s wonderful that we are part of such a diverse university that offers opportunities such as these.”

It’s important to celebrate all cultures and learn about each other’s beliefs and cultural experiences.  Understanding others has a variety of benefits; we can become better students, teachers, parents and scholars, and it will ultimately make us better people. A lot of misconceptions exist between groups of people, and learning helps us to better appreciate one another.

“The importance of Japan Month is great,” said French exchange student Mathieu Bouchaud.  “It’s not very often that a culture is celebrated and appreciated for an entire month, and learning about the world and its people is imperative for every individual.  We should feel so lucky to be a part of this.”

As Japanese peace activist Daisaku Ikeda stated, “People can only live fully by helping others to live. Cultures can only realize their full richness by honoring other traditions. And only by respecting life can humanity continue to exist.”

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Apparel and Textile Design Fashion Show

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Apparel and Textile Design Fashion Show


I got the opportunity to be a photographer at the ATD Fashion Show this year!  It was so much fun being able to shoot the models throughout the day.  Enjoy my take on the show…I think you’ll like it! :)

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

Photo Credit: Jenna Chabot

 

 

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