Yeast of Burden

[couple1] Yeast infections. It\’s definitely not one of those subjects that rolls off the tip of the tongue of the person sitting next to you on the CATA bus. While a yeast infection is most often associated with women and \”women parts,\” do not be fooled. Men can get yeast infections, too.
The infection, otherwise known as candidiasis, is the growing of Candida albicans and other forms of yeast within the vagina. This type of fungus is part of the normal environment of the skin, mouth and intestinal tract. In a healthy vagina, the presence of some yeast may not be a problem. But when a woman’s system is out of balance, yeast-like organisms can grow profusely and cause a thick, white discharge. So where do the men come into the picture?
In order for males to contract a yeast infection of any kind (yes there is more than one) he has to have unprotected sex with a woman who has a yeast infection at the time of penetration. It is extremely rare for a male to contract a yeast infection, but it’s still possible. [yeastquote]
\”I do not know that I would feel comfortable just coming out and asking if someone had a yeast infection – it is kind of a touchy subject,\” said 2005 MSU graduate Jared Eaton. \”I would hope that the girl I am going to sleep with would tell me those types of things beforehand, and if she didn\’t that is what protection is for.\”
Food industry management junior Adrienne Lagrou said she had no idea a man could get a yeast infection from a woman. “I would never have sex if I had a yeast infection and any woman that would is just crazy,” said Lagrou.
Partners have a tendency to give it back and forth because it may not be treated properly or at all. Alex Kardovavich, who is part of the wound team at Sparrow Medical Center said, “Most of the time people assume men just don’t get yeast infections, so when a female has one – if she knows she has one – she will choose not to share this with her partner either out of fear or embarrassment.”
The elements of a male yeast infection, otherwise known as balanitis, are of course a little different than a yeast infection a woman would get, but essentially the two share symptoms and have similar treatment options. “Symptoms of a male yeast infection could range from itching, to irritation, to burning sensations,” said first year medical intern Robert Vaidya. “If these symptoms persist without the individual seeking any medical attention he could potentially suffer from serious, long repercussions.”
When treating yeast infections, be sure to see a doctor before taking something over-the-counter. “It is very important that one seek medical attention at the signs of anything unfamiliar,” said Olin pharmacist Tom Ball. “We would not recommend just coming into the pharmacy and picking up just any medication. It is very important that the person get the proper diagnosis and follow that up with taking the proper medication.”
Medications come in many forms like creams or oral medication. “The patient’s doctor may prescribe an oral diflucan or some kind of cream that would be used to treat a yeast infection,” Ball said. “Depending on symptoms, the doctor might prescribe something different for severe pain as opposed to something else for mild pain and irritation.”
Some males are at higher risk for yeast infections than others. “Older diabetic men, uncircumcised males and males who do not practice proper hygiene are probably the most likely candidates for yeast infections,\” said Rebecca Wolfe, a family medicine practictioner at Sparrow Family Medical Services in East Lansing. \”Men with diabetes can develop yeast infections because the elevated sugar in the urine creates a beneficial environment for yeast.”
Male yeast infections usually appear on the penis near the glands. “If a man has been circumcised the glands tend to be drier but on an uncircumcised male the foreskin is going to have that nice moist ring underneath the foreskin,\” Wolfe said. \”It is out there, and while our body is working to protect us from infection, if something changes in our body then we are more likely to get an infection.”
Yeast infections in men can cause irritation and soreness of the head of the penis, severe itching on the head of the penis, redness color and possibly small blisters on the head of the penis. The symptoms of a yeast infection can strike a remarkable resemblance to Chlamydia. That’s right, an STD. An extensive list of Chlamydia symptoms for both men and women can be found at www.healthline.com. Symptoms of Chlamydia in men consist of burning pain during urination, more frequent urination, pain and swelling in the testicles and redness at the tip of the penis.
Wolfe said that although it is rare for her to encounter many males with yeast infections, it is still possible. “I almost never see male yeast infections. I think I can count the number of men I have treated for a yeast infection,” Wolfe said. “The number is very few because [the genital area] is not as hot and moist and sweaty of an environment on a man.”
According to Wolfe, “If a man lets a yeast infection go unattended for long enough it will not only get into the glands of the penis but it will get up into the opening of the urethra and the pain will be just as severe as having a urinary tract infection.”
Ouch. Keep yeast infections from spreading by using protection when having sex. Because no one deserves that yeast of burden.

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Yeast of Burden

[people] Yeast infections. It\’s definitely not one of those subjects that rolls off the tip of the tongue of the person sitting next to you on the CATA bus. While a yeast infection is most often associated with women and \”women parts,\” do not be fooled. Men can get yeast infections, too.
The infection, otherwise known as candidiasis, is the growing of Candida albicans and other forms of yeast within the vagina. This type of fungus is part of the normal environment of the skin, mouth and intestinal tract. In a healthy vagina, the presence of some yeast may not be a problem. But when a woman’s system is out of balance, yeast-like organisms can grow profusely and cause a thick, white discharge. So where do the men come into the picture?
In order for males to contract a yeast infection of any kind (yes there is more than one) he has to have unprotected sex with a woman who has a yeast infection at the time of penetration. It is extremely rare for a male to contract a yeast infection, but it’s still possible. [yeastquote]
\”I do not know that I would feel comfortable just coming out and asking if someone had a yeast infection – it is kind of a touchy subject,\” said 2005 MSU graduate Jared Eaton. \”I would hope that the girl I am going to sleep with would tell me those types of things beforehand, and if she didn\’t that is what protection is for.\”
Food industry management junior Adrienne Lagrou said she had no idea a man could get a yeast infection from a woman. “I would never have sex if I had a yeast infection and any woman that would is just crazy,” said Lagrou.
Partners have a tendency to give it back and forth because it may not be treated properly or at all. Alex Kardovavich, who is part of the wound team at Sparrow Medical Center said, “Most of the time people assume men just don’t get yeast infections, so when a female has one – if she knows she has one – she will choose not to share this with her partner either out of fear or embarrassment.”
The elements of a male yeast infection, otherwise known as balanitis, are of course a little different than a yeast infection a woman would get, but essentially the two share symptoms and have similar treatment options. “Symptoms of a male yeast infection could range from itching, to irritation, to burning sensations,” said first year medical intern Robert Vaidya. “If these symptoms persist without the individual seeking any medical attention he could potentially suffer from serious, long repercussions.”
When treating yeast infections, be sure to see a doctor before taking something over-the-counter. “It is very important that one seek medical attention at the signs of anything unfamiliar,” said Olin pharmacist Tom Ball. “We would not recommend just coming into the pharmacy and picking up just any medication. It is very important that the person get the proper diagnosis and follow that up with taking the proper medication.”
Medications come in many forms like creams or oral medication. “The patient’s doctor may prescribe an oral diflucan or some kind of cream that would be used to treat a yeast infection,” Ball said. “Depending on symptoms, the doctor might prescribe something different for severe pain as opposed to something else for mild pain and irritation.”
Some males are at higher risk for yeast infections than others. “Older diabetic men, uncircumcised males and males who do not practice proper hygiene are probably the most likely candidates for yeast infections,\” said Rebecca Wolfe, a family medicine practictioner at Sparrow Family Medical Services in East Lansing. \”Men with diabetes can develop yeast infections because the elevated sugar in the urine creates a beneficial environment for yeast.”
Male yeast infections usually appear on the penis near the glands. “If a man has been circumcised the glands tend to be drier but on an uncircumcised male the foreskin is going to have that nice moist ring underneath the foreskin,\” Wolfe said. \”It is out there, and while our body is working to protect us from infection, if something changes in our body then we are more likely to get an infection.”
Yeast infections in men can cause irritation and soreness of the head of the penis, severe itching on the head of the penis, redness color and possibly small blisters on the head of the penis. The symptoms of a yeast infection can strike a remarkable resemblance to Chlamydia. That’s right, an STD. An extensive list of Chlamydia symptoms for both men and women can be found at www.healthline.com. Symptoms of Chlamydia in men consist of burning pain during urination, more frequent urination, pain and swelling in the testicles and redness at the tip of the penis.
Wolfe said that although it is rare for her to encounter many males with yeast infections, it is still possible. “I almost never see male yeast infections. I think I can count the number of men I have treated for a yeast infection,” Wolfe said. “The number is very few because [the genital area] is not as hot and moist and sweaty of an environment on a man.”
According to Wolfe, “If a man lets a yeast infection go unattended for long enough it will not only get into the glands of the penis but it will get up into the opening of the urethra and the pain will be just as severe as having a urinary tract infection.”
Ouch. Keep yeast infections from spreading by using protection when having sex. Because no one deserves that yeast of burden.

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Pandemic Proportions

[ribbon]Rapid weight loss, recurring fever or profuse night sweats, depression and unexplainable fatigue might ring a bell to almost every student on campus, especially as cold and flu season creeps up on us. The symptoms would lead to a routine doctor visit for the same dreaded diagnosis you heard last year; get some rest, take some antibiotics and take it easy because you’ve got the flu. But what if instead of the anticipated conclusion and usual dose of antibiotics, your doctor advises you to take an HIV test.
Any individual experiencing the symptoms of HIV could go as long as months without recognizing them as being more than the flu. The early signs are not something someone would be particularly caught off guard or frightened by – if there are any symptoms at all. People can go years without discovering they even have HIV.
“It’s scary that there are so many people that have it and don’t even know,\” said fisheries and wildlife sophomore Stephen Burr. He recently got tested and said he told his friends and family, who were supportive. “They thought it was a good idea and basically what it comes down to is that you just gotta know.”
Since HIV was first recognized on Dec. 1, 1981, the virus has affected millions and millions of people around the world. \”Talking about the history of AIDS and what we knew 25 years ago is like taking a trip down memory lane,” said Patrick Lombardi, volunteer coordinator for the Lansing Area AIDS Network (LAAN). He said he remembers a time when AIDS wasn’t even around and that he had no choice but to face it because almost immediately he began to lose friends who were infected. “It got to the point where I was going to a funeral every week, sometimes twice a week. So many people were just dying,” he said.
Today, 40 million people are living with HIV/AIDS around the world, with women and young people being increasingly at risk for HIV infection. Most people have heard about HIV/AIDS, but there are still misconceptions floating around – like that HIV is a gay man\’s illness or that it is really only a problem in African countries.
[mary] According to The Foundation for AIDS Research, the acronym HIV stands for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, the virus that causes AIDS. HIV infects human cells and uses the energy and nutrients provided by those cells to grow and reproduce.
AIDS stands for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, a disease in which the body’s immune system breaks down and becomes unable to fight off infections. Known as “opportunistic infections,” these and other illnesses take advantage of a weakened immune system, leaving the human body without enough strength to fight back. AIDS has killed more than 25 million people worldwide, including more than 500,000 Americans. It is the fourth leading cause of death worldwide.
People with AIDS who can afford medication can prolong their lives, but there is still no cure, making prevention the key. “Searching for a cure is important but we really need to focus on prevention,” said Dennis Martell, coordinator for MSU’s Health Education Services.
While awareness is being raised, even more questions may spring up as a result. Olin Health Center’s Sex Education employee Erin Williston said the main goal of the education process and program is to make the resources individuals may need readily available. Williston said, “If a student is sure he or she is going to have sex and they are aware of the repercussions of not practicing safe sex, then the best thing a campus organization can offer is a place where the students can go to get what they need to make the safest and smartest decision.”
As part of maintaining a preventative attitude, Olin established the Condom Connection in partnership with the Residence Hall Association. Together these organizations work to distribute at least 60,000 condoms around campus per year to encourage safe sex.
LAAN’s role in the community is to serve anyone who might be concerned about their health. “Whether people are choosing to have safe sex or not is up to them, we are just here to help them after they decide they may have made a bad decision,” Lombardi said. “For a long time it has been thought, especially in my own personal experience, that because I am associated with LAAN, people automatically assume I’m gay. What people need to understand is that AIDS has the potential to affect anyone.” Gay, straight, bi, transgender – the risk is still there.
The Foundation for AIDS Research reports that women are at a greater risk of HIV infection through vaginal sex than men, although the virus can also be transmitted from women to men.
[poppins]HIV is a big deal. Having unprotected sex is a big deal. Surprisingly enough however, in a study done by the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research (IPPSR), 58 percent of students surveyed said they use a condom every time they have sex. Breaking the numbers down, out of 40,000-plus students at MSU, this does not necessarily mean more than 20,000 of them are using a condom every time they have sex. But it does paint a pretty clear picture that based on a sample of 2,000 people surveyed, of that 2,000, at least 1,000 reported using a condom every time they had sex. The results are up four points from 2002, and according to Williston, “Over the past four years we have only seen percentages go up.” Williston credits the rise in percentage of condom use among students to the fact that “access is key,\” referring to the recent installment of prevention based programs, such as Olin\’s “Condom Connection.”
HIV testing is not hard to come by. For example, walking into Olin on a regular Thursday afternoon and asking an employee at the front desk who to speak to about HIV testing, you will likely be sent to the third floor for an on-the-spot appointment. The whole appointment includes a short general information session, a counseling session and then the testing itself. The testing is free with the results taking only one week, and results can be anonymous. “We recommend that if an individual has been sleeping with someone or intends to start sleeping with someone – whether it be a significant other or just a partner – that they come get tested together,” Williston said. “It’s the safest way to be safe.”
Olin is not the only place close to campus that offers HIV testing. Planned Parenthood advises sexually active patients to have “safer sex” in order to reduce the risk of exchanging blood, semen, or vaginal fluids with your sex partner. The term “safer sex” is used because the safer the sex is, the lower the risk of infection.
Twenty-five years ago it was important to face the facts and ‘out’ HIV as a deadly virus and possible killer. Now 25 years later, it is important to continue to face the facts, but also strive to prevent and educate people before it continues to take lives at an extremely fast pace. “It’s not that AIDS is a terrible condition to live with, because after all it is manageable,” said Williston. “It’s just that it takes so much out of you – both physically and emotionally.\”
Want to get involved?
-The AIDS Walk: \”One Step Toward a Solution\” will be held in East Lansing’s own Valley Court Park on Sunday, Oct. 1. The Lansing Area Aids Network, along with MSU’s Health Education Services, will work together in an effort to raise both awareness of the virus as well as to provide education and general information surrounding the long term effects that AIDS has on individuals and their families. Health Education Services, based out of Olin Health Center, will have a table set up with an array of information regarding anything from safe sex to how to get tested for HIV to who is affected and how.
-To aid in the battle of AIDS, Gap Stores are launching a new advertising campaign promoting Product Red. The new line of clothes includes shirts with phrases like \”Inspi(red)\” and \”Desi(red).\” The premise of the campaign is change the world with the purchase of a shirt. The proceeds from the shirt will go to Africa to help the fight against the epidemic.

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Twenty-Year-Old Virgins

[couple]Every weekday morning Rachel wakes up to her alarm, gets out of bed and starts her day with a workout. She showers and proceeds to log onto the computer at home where she begins a day of online classes. She usually grabs a quick lunch sometime throughout the course of the day and then baby-sits in the later afternoon and evenings. Most nights, after work, Rachel spends time with her boyfriend Richard. The two of them do homework and watch TV together. You might say they are a normal couple. And they are, except they don’t have sex.
Abstinence is not exactly what you would call common practice, especially here at MSU. For those that choose to be abstinent it is just that: a choice. Some hold off on sex until marriage or until a certain time in life but what is it that makes people choose abstinence?
To abstain or not to abstain. Some choose to abstain from any behavior that their beliefs may prohibit – smoking, drinking, etc. – and some choose to solely abstain from sex. Father Mark Inglot, pastor at St. John student parish in East Lansing, describes abstinence as something a lot of people do not see it as. “You abstain not from sex but you abstain for another person in the right context,” Father Inglot says, meaning that one doesn’t necessarily hold out from sex but for the person they are meant to “give” their virginity to.
English junior Rachel Prouty and her boyfriend, Richard Vanklyve have been dating since high school. They are still going strong after seven years and are engaged to be married this August. The two of them have known each other since they were kids and have been going to church together for years. Rachel and Richard are devout Baptists and have vowed to each other, their families and God to save themselves for their wedding night.
Oftentimes individuals choose not to engage in sexual activity because they believe that based on the bible they shouldn’t, or at least until they get married. Vincent Walkup is a United Methodist pastor who says, “there are always going to be temptations and depending on how strong of a walk with the Lord the individual has will usually determine the standards they set and are able to meet.” According to LCC freshman Stephanie Saylor, who is Mormon, standards she has set for not having sex before marriage have not negatively affected any of her relationships. “My friends do not look down on me for not having sex, if anything they respect me more because I have stuck to my beliefs,” Saylor says.
[2]However, just because someone goes to church and claims to be religious, this does not necessarily mean they are not having sex. One student admitted to going to church his whole life and being taught that sex before marriage was not right, but he is not a virgin. “I’m 21-years-old and as long as I’m not sleeping with a different girl every night, I don’t think what I’m doing is wrong,” he says.
Not every religion or set of beliefs is the same. Sitting through a contemporary Baptist service is going to be a little bit different than sitting through a Muslim service at a mosque. Just like church services, their rules and practices differ too. For example, the Ten Commandments are the set of rules which Christian churches base rights and wrongs. Muslims believe that as far as abstinence goes there are different categories.
These categories are like commandments but according to Raghda, a teacher at the Islamic Center on Harrison Road in East Lansing – some rules are more important than others. She believes that because an individual submits his or herself to God, he or she will gain intellect and free will from him. “It is the free will that someone possesses that will allow them to make choices; choices to obey or disobey the rules God has given them,” says Raghda. It is because of the deep relationship with God that practicing Muslims do not have sex before marriage. Raghda explains this as being comparable to the way the traffic system works. “I know if I get pulled over for going five over the speed limit the consequences are not that great but I know if I get pulled over for doing twenty over the speed limit, I could suffer much more extreme consequences.” She says, “This is like disobeying God’s orders because the rules are set in advance and I know if I do something God tells me not to do, I will be punished to a great extent.”
Sexually active people might want to keep having sex, so for virgins the choice might be simpler since they have not experienced it. For Kathie Church a youth educator at Holt United Methodist, her path is clear. “I’m 43-years-old and I’ve never had sex because I believe according to God’s word, I’m not supposed to have sex if I’m not married. I’ve been single my whole life and I’m doing just fine,” says Church. Because Kathie hasn’t had sex and does not plan to until she gets married, she doesn’t feel like she’s missing out on anything. “It saves you so much emotional, physical and spiritual pain or stress.”
Physics sophomore Daniel Bruder feels differently. Bruder does not come from any kind of religious background and feels there is nothing wrong with having sex – outside of marriage or in general. He feels like people who commit to abstinence are missing out on sex. “Even though people don’t know what it is, they are still missing it. They might be sparing themselves any pain but at the same time they aren’t experiencing any pleasure,” Bruder says.
Apparel design sophomore Angela Manes who is an active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Ladder-day Saints and has been exposed to God and different religions her whole life says she has never considered having sex with a single boyfriend even though she has dated many guys. “I set a standard for myself based on what I believe and I’m not going to let myself down.” Angela has lost boyfriends over this commitment and she has hooked the gentleman she is currently dating and who she plans to be engaged to soon. And to think, it’s all because she made a commitment to herself and God. “As part of my religion, I believe that sex is for married people, I’m not married, so I’m not having sex.”
While graduate student, Tamir Mujab hasn’t necessarily taken a vow of abstinence, his personal conclusion about college students he sees walking around campus (especially Thursday through Saturday nights) are that many come off as hardcore partiers and sex-feigns. “Students just don’t think about how ridiculous they are being. They are so loose with everything – how they speak, how they act – it’s ridiculous,” says the 27-year-old.
[pray] Religion seems to be predominant theme when it comes to holding off on premarital sex. Tiffany Nelson is a Mormon who believes that sex is something that should be saved for a husband and wife to experience together. “Sex is a sacred thing. It brings the two people so much closer together in so many ways. There is the physical, the emotional and the spiritual bond, which becomes so much stronger. It’s such a big deal,” Nelson says. The similar values Saylor has have stuck with her whole life. “I was brought up being taught that nothing else was acceptable. You do not have sex with someone until you marry them and know you are going to be with them for the rest of your life,” Saylor says.
What about becoming a born-again virgin? Born-again is a term often used when one realizes they want to become part of the church. As a result they give themselves to God. He becomes the one they look to and obey and being born-again usually means the person is born-again into faith. Becoming a born-again virgin is a similar concept. “Sometimes an individual who claims to know God will make a mistake and have to ask for forgiveness,” Raghda says. “When the person realizes they have sinned and they confess it to God they become a born-again virgin meaning because they repented and God forgave them and they have another chance to obey his commands.”
This concept can seem foreign and unbelievable to the non-religious. “I personally would say that was bull if a girl told me she was a ‘born-again’ virgin. I guess if she honestly believed that she could be and she did everything possible she could to get to that point, I would respect it,” Bruder says.
How about being accepted into the church or into a new faith if you’ve “sinned” in the past? Saylor doesn’t think judging someone on their past is worth it, and would accept a ‘born-again virgin.’ “If they realize what they did was wrong and they want to change, I am going to do everything I can to help; even if that means they have done wrong in the past,” says Saylor.
Religion, however, is not the only reason people withstand from having sex. Some fear the possibility and likelihood of contracting a sexually transmitted disease. Social work sophomore Henry James thinks people are “reckless” when it comes to STDs. “People just assume that because they are in college they can have a good time – with everyone. Sometimes I just want to scream in people’s faces: ‘News flash: STD ALERT’!”
Surprising as it may be, more students than anyone might actually give credit to, are virgins. For example, Father Mark says he talks to students everyday who think they are the only virgins out there. “A lot of students come to me saying things like ‘I feel like I’m the only virgin out there.’ I just reassure them that they aren’t. I know for a fact that if I got all the students from MSU who are virgins in one place at the same time I’d be able to fill up the Breslin Center.”

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Love in the Time of Blackberries

[1]You woke up 10 minutes ago to the sound of the newest ringer you have downloaded on your cell phone, KT Tunstall’s Black Horse and a Cherry Tree. You drag yourself to your computer chair where you begin checking away messages on AIM – most of which probably read “sleeping.” Next up, logging into MSU web mail where you have three friends awaiting your request on Facebook. It’s off to cyberland where you meet up with your online poker pals and start an early game of poker before packing up your books and iPod and heading off to class.
Technology is proving to have control over us as humans, not necessarily the other way around. We created it, we control it and its functions, and yet it controls us. It determines our love lives, friends, how we talk to friends and how strong our relationships can be depending on how much we allow technology to do. We cannot get away from it, and if we could for long enough, we may decide we cannot live without it. Whether you believe it or not, technology has got a plan for us and everyone we have ever had a relationship with.
Saturday, March 4, 10:30 a.m. The Tallahassee airport, waiting to board a plane to Miami for fun in the sun (spring break style). While sitting with my mom and dad at our boarding gate, my dad whips out his iMac. Not ten minutes go by before the pilot of our outgoing flight introduces himself and they begin a “friendship” because of this computer. It turns out that the pilot was thinking of investing in one himself, but was still using Windows and was unsure about making the switch. The two talked for almost thirty minutes about nothing but new Apple stuff. They will probably never speak again, but for that half hour in the airport they became friends because of technology they had in common.
But many people, not just dads, seem to have an undying love affair with new gadgets and the latest advancement in anything involving technology. For Jeremy Dillavou, it’s his job to be ahead of the technological curve. He is a double agent for the Geek Squad at Best Buy. He says that overall technology is a good thing. “I have relationships that are kept alive because of technology. If it weren’t for Myspace I wouldn’t be updated on old friends,” Dillavou said. “Because of computer technology you can ‘meet up’ or be updated without calling or actually meeting up – it’s a short cut.”
Some keep in touch via Myspace or Facebook, while others rely on online video games to enhance their social lives. Marine Biology freshman Brian Smith has what he calls ‘online friends’. “You make friends with some people and put them on a friends list then when they get online and play the game you’re playing, you can talk to them and meet up in the game if you want to,” Smith said. His roommate, Jason Mathis, thinks it’s cool to interact with all kinds of people through online video games. “You can meet people from all around the world.” So whether you can see them or not, the fact that you are connected to them through the Internet and can talk to them with a headset is enough to keep the online friendship alive.[2]
Chris Lee, a second year student at LCC says, “You have a totally different group of friends online. You play games with these people and you form relationships based on games you play with them.”
Thursday March 8, 8:46 p.m. “Oh my gosh, they’re coming out with an even better BlackBerry than that one, you have got to see it!” These were the first words out of my flight-mate’s mouth when he saw that the girl to his right was powering her Blackberry into the off position as our plane was about to leave the Memphis airport. Because of this amazing little device, I was entertained for almost the duration of our one-and-a-half hour flight. The two struck up not only an intense conversation, but also a relationship because of their almost matching omni-cellular devices. These two could still be emailing each other everyday via Blackberry; heck, they could be engaged and planning their wedding by now.
After a few days outside the realm of reality under the much-needed rays of the Florida sun, I was blindsided when I realized how much we depend on technology. We depend on it to communicate with others and to make sure we know what time our flight departure is. We even “need” it for entertainment. Everywhere you go, everyone has an iPod or mp3 player of some sort. No college student in his right mind can leave home without some sort of wireless entertainment attached to his hip. We have relationships with technology itself, which in turn lead to developing real ones because of technology.
During my reflection on the past week I had spent away from my cell phone (which meant away from text messaging and online weather/sports updates), reality also began to set in and I had to face the fact that I was about to enter back into a fast paced world.
While the guy on the plane probably wasn’t using his new communication device solely as a form of getting a date with a complete stranger, it isn’t surprising the lengths people will go to get a date. Advertising junior Andrea Paul was at the main library studying for an econ exam and was unexpectedly approached by two men. “Hey, you wanna go to the bar?” guy number 1 asked. “I’m at the library because I’m studying,” said Paul. “I’m not going to the bar tonight but maybe some other time,” she continued. She gave him her number anticipating there would be another opportunity to hang out. Not 20 minutes later, she received a text message from the same guy, while he was at the bar. It read, “Ur missing outJ.” What a way to get her attention. “I haven’t actually spoken with him since,” Paul said of her library admirer.
As far as couples go, technology can make or break a relationship. Marketing junior Chase Salas says he chatted online with a girl who he ended up meeting and hanging out with. “I definitely think relationships can start online and I know they can actually end up working out,” said Salas. [3]
Political science sophomore Georg Schuttler’s experience did not seem to work out as nicely as he hoped. He was at Cedar Point with another friend and they met a girl who they ended up hanging out with. Turns out she had a crush on Georg and she gave him her phone number. She decided they should start texting, but unknowingly made the mistake of typing a message to Georg that read, “I know I text George (spelling his name incorrectly), but I really like you.”
“She needs to learn to keep her boyfriends straight,” Schuttler said of the snafus.
Monday, March 13, 12:27 p.m. The people on the way to class would rather converse with their iPod than with each other. Chances are, if people are talking to each other on their way to class it’s because they are asking their iPod-mate at the bus stop about their music selection. People at the crosswalk seem to live by a do-what-you-can-to-pass-the-time-in-the-quickest-possible-way philosophy. Everyone, and I mean everyone, seems to be utilizing a phone, listening to music or if they are incredibly into the latest and greatest advancement in the technological world, possibly viewing a movie on their video iPod.
The world of technology has allowed us to use things like a web cam to communicate and feel closer to a friend who might be 500 miles away. It has also aided in the personal feeling you get from conversing with someone. But it allows us to talk without tone and send monotone messages that can be translated in many different ways. The funny thing is that even after realizing our gross dependence on technology, we still find it okay to be engulfed in every update and quirk of the latest electronic device.
In a journal of advertising research by Maura Clancey, she focuses on the effects a television has on people in the room when a set has been turned on. Her study states that when the TV is on it \”freezes everybody,\” diminishes conversation and causes everything that goes on between people to stop and might induce viewers to blot out the real world. For example, you’re watching \”Grey’s Anatomy” with friends on a Sunday night. Someone leaves the room for a minute only to return and find that anything other than something related to the show will not be accepted or acknowledged in conversation. This is a time people get together to watch a show they have been waiting all week for. There seems to be that bond that strengthens the relationship all because people watch the same show together. “It’s the end of the weekend and it’s the best show ever. Most of my friends don’t have to work on Sunday nights so it works out perfectly,” advertising senior Dana LeMire said of her “Grey’s” get-togethers.
Monday, March, 27 9:50 p.m. Signed onto the infamous AOL Instant Messenger and chatting with (long pause), my mom. She’s almost 50 (sorry if you’re reading this, Mom, but it’s for the sake of the article). This might sound crazy but it all started the day or two after moving into Akers my freshman year. I was online in no time. So was my mom. I remember receiving an instant message from a mysterious screen name: msumommie. I could not believe my eyes when I read the text in the IM box, “Meredith, it’s me, Dad downloaded this for me on my laptop so now we can talk on the computer!” As far as my mother and I are concerned, I honestly believe we have developed a stronger online relationship than on the phone.
When families are tech-saavy together they have a new bond. A new T-Mobile commercial features a mom and dad searching frantically around the house for their children. They are worried because the house is so quiet. Finally, the dad runs outside to the car screaming “you better not be doing what I think you’re doing!” He opens the door to find the kids texting and then you see the mom at the front door screaming with terror.
According to Geek Squad Agent Jeremy Dillavou, families who have a lot of technology around them have more in common. “People or families that are surrounded by technology constantly talk to each other and communicate nonstop because there is that common link.” In a way this makes things “more organized but more hectic,” said Dillavou.
Some families do not necessarily need technology to keep relationships alive. Take, for example, horticulture sophomore Daniel Lewis who looks forward to seeing his Dad because they like to relax and catch up. “We’ll go have a beer and talk and then when we get a chance we go hunting together. This is how we interact. We have things to say on the phone but rarely do we just sit and chat unless we are together doing it.”
Simply put, technology is helping those who want to be helped. Telecommunications senior Jermond Wiggins thinks because it allows things to happen at such a fast rate, it cannot be anything but good. “You can text your girlfriend and send her a picture. Then at the same time you can get back to your friends and family members and keep everyone happy.”[4]
There’s no way to get around the many ways technology affects our relationships and friendships with the ones we love. By claiming to always be one step ahead, we’ve let technology get one step ahead of us. Though we may not see what is in our future, it does. But the real failing would be to stop the human interaction that makes us, well, human; even if you have to do it with your cell or Blackberry from time to time.

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A Good-Time Generation

[2]The music is so loud you can hardly think. Clouds of smoke surround you. You can’t find your friends; well at least not the ones you came with, and everywhere you look seems the same as the place you saw just five seconds ago. Finally you see a familiar face and run to the person as if you haven’t seen them in years. It’s 2 a.m. and you’ve been out since 6 p.m.
This is the all too familiar description of a much-anticipated field trip out with your friends that after a couple hours has turned into what seems to be one of the longest and messed-up (to say it nicely) nights of your life.
College life just seems to lend itself to using drinking and even smoking marijuana as a social device. It is probably safe to say most college students in Michigan come from families where drinking (or for some even casual drug use) is not necessarily frowned upon. We meet significant others after a dose of “liquid courage,” make friends over occasionally lighting up, and are these really terrible things?
Party Culture
So what is it exactly about partying that has such an appeal? Most students, at least those who are of the legal drinking age (and those select few who are lucky enough to slide by with a fake ID), know that drinking is a preferred way to socialize and even connect with others.
“The college environment facilitates drinking,” said psychology professor Brent Donnellan. “There is something about the culture surrounding drinking which facilitates it. There is also the thrill or sensation seeking which drives drinking.”
Drinking in college, as students know, is the farthest thing from uncommon. Walking into a Quality Dairy convenience store and shopping for anything other than alcohol on a Thursday through Saturday night is uncommon (unless you\’re buying chasers to go with that alcohol). The Harvard School of Public Health conducted a national survey in 2004 that found that nearly half of all college students surveyed drank four or five drinks in one sitting within the previous two weeks. In contrast, according to the National College Health Assessment survey that was also conducted in 2004, 20 percent of MSU’s total population reported that they do not drink alcohol and 10 percent of that 20 percent say they have never consumed alcohol.
Gary Stollak is a clinical psychologist and a MSU psychology professor. “Until someone’s compulsive behavior is affecting their everyday life, there is no problem, as far as I, as a clinical psychologist, am concerned,” he said. It’s not necessarily the drinking that’s the problem. Both drinking and playing online poker are considered social behavior. “The problem comes when the person is playing poker so much that it hinders the relationship with the family or when the drinking is taking such a toll that one is tripping and messing up constantly at work,” said Stollak.
It may not even be getting drunk that people seek. Plenty of people, like 22-year-old Adam Zink, claim to drink only one night per week. “I drink with a group of friends, and I\’d say my wife is there most of the time,\” said Zink. \”I will only drink ‘in excess’ around my close friends, not just with any random people.”
Criminal justice senior, John Ormsby is a 21-year-old who goes to the bar at least two times a week. “It’s nice because it’s time I don’t have to worry about school and it’s a good time to hang out with my friends,” he said. Ormsby chooses going to the bar over hanging out at home because, “I don’t have to worry about the cops coming and issuing a noise violation or things getting broken.”
[3]Zinc, on the other hand, prefers to drink in the comfort of his home while playing poker or hanging out with friends. “If I were single, I\’m sure I would enjoy the bar scene more, but it seems pointless for me to go,” he said. Avoiding the bars in order to steer clear of conversation with random people certainly is not the popular vote among most college students. “Going to the bar and hanging out with my friends and just having a good time with whoever is around is a blast,” said advertising senior Diane Bordt.
Along with drinking, smoking marijuana is also part of party culture in and around universities. Students that do smoke marijuana, with or without drinking, are in the words of Brent Donnellan ‘sensation seeking’ or are also looking for the buzz or high to take a load off and loosen up. Perhaps better known for marijuana use is the University of Michigan’s campus. Ann Arbor even dedicates a day, Hash Bash, to using marijuana. Police patrol the city in order to keep things civil but because of the celebratory attitude within the city, there are not usually many arrests.
Marijuana laws in the Ann Arbor city limits state that if an individual is caught smoking marijuana they are issued a $50 ticket for a civil infraction. East Lansing law, which includes MSU, states that if a person is caught with the drug or smoking it and has not had it prescribed to them by a health practitioner they are guilty of possession and in turn are charged with a misdemeanor. The fine alone will cost you $25 and don’t forget to tack on court fees, community service for up to 45 days and the attendance and completion of a program of substance abuse. The individual is also then subject to the suspension of their driver’s license; this is left to the discretion of the court.
However, just like at MSU, if someone is on Michigan’s campus and is caught smoking marijuana, they are arrested and taken to jail and can suffer court costs and possibly other consequences.
Rebecca Allen heads alcohol-related health education efforts at MSU and she is a Community Relations Coalition board member who said the number of students who smoke marijuana at U of M are definitely higher than the numbers at MSU.
But as U of M pre-med junior Taylor Nichols said, “If people are going to smoke, they are going to smoke regardless of the law.”
Harsher laws in East Lansing may or may not lead to what’s perceived as lower marijuana use here rather than in Ann Arbor. According to the National College Health Assessment conducted in 2003, 63.7 percent of 1,326 students at MSU said they have never smoked marijuana. Allen said these numbers remain about the same each year the survey is conducted.
Patrice Flax, coordinator of U of M’s University Health Service, Health Promotion and Community Relations, said, “I think people see Ann Arbor as a town that’s progressive and libertarian, therefore we kind of do whatever. The marijuana thing is part of Ann Arbor’s culture and that’s just how it is.”
[1]Partying as Social Capital
In college, many students use alcohol and marijuana as a way to build social capital – the feelings of connectedness among individuals that fosters community and civic engagement. Fraternities and sororities on college campuses seem to be known for crazy partying, but also for their connections in the community. Surprisingly enough, Taylor Nichols joined the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity at U of M because he was interested in a brotherhood with people who set high standards for themselves both academically and socially. “Being involved with the fraternity is something that poses somewhat of a challenge when it comes to the culture of drinking,” said Nichols. When asked whether he spent much time, outside of partying, with his brothers Nichols responded, “Unfortunately, partying is what you have to do to socially in order to interact with your brothers. Some party harder than others and unfortunately there isn’t much of an in-between so if you’re going to hang out with them to party, then you really have to party with them.”
As long as alcohol and marijuana are available, and with so many bars and small-time drug dealers, they are available, students will probably always be a part of a party culture. Undecided sophomore Jessica Elrod has friends that smoke pot but she says it isn’t that popular of an interest among the majority of her friends. “I think at first they do it to fit in then smoking weed becomes more routine,\” she said. \”Eventually people begin to think they have to do it to enhance their social experience.” Jessica’s feelings regarding people’s want to fit in go along with what Professor Donnellan says about peer groups. “We follow norms to establish a common ground with peers.”
Of course, sometimes people even meet their one and only while partying, which may be an unseen upside to having a good time. Social work junior Amanda Faas’s parents, Dave and Holly Faas, met at a Kalamazoo Coral Gables one night while Holly and a girlfriend of hers were shooting pool. Dave and a buddy came to ask if they could play doubles and after two years of dating, Dave and Holly were engaged. They will celebrate their 22nd wedding anniversary in June. Now the chances of finding true love at Rick’s on a Thursday night are probably pretty slim, but social drinking is called social drinking for a reason and it’s not impossible. (Try and count how many friends or significant others you’ve met while out partying, just try.)
Whether headed to the bar, planning a kegger or even burning one – remember the culture that makes college unique, if not hazy, and respect the substances by not going too far. While you may not be as lucky as Dave and Holly, chances are you’ll have a good time – well, what you remember of it anyway.
Cheers.

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A Personal Valentine

[waist2]The reminders are everywhere: candy hearts have crept back into our diets and the greeting card aisle in the drug store is decidedly pink.
Lovebirds are flaunting their seemingly perfect relationships while the rest of the college populace does everything possible not to recognize the Hallmark holiday that’s upon us. Valentine’s Day is the one day when people are supposed to be in love. But what about being in love 365 days a year? (And I don’t mean with that boyfriend or girlfriend that won’t last any longer than the chocolates you purchased for them.) No, I am talking about true love of the most important kind – real self-love. Sure, most people will say ‘Of course I love myself’ if asked, but those words fall flat with the first, ‘Damn, I wish my thighs didn’t look like a honeycomb’ comment that slips out.
Most of us wish we could love ourselves unconditionally, meaning just the way we are now. An organization at MSU called Respecting and Understanding Body Image (RUBI) is trying to help people do just that. RUBI has been around for almost five years and has focused on not only helping people who need someone to talk to but also educating people on how to respect oneself as a part of becoming a stronger individual.
Dietetics junior Lindsey Lazenby is one of many students that has struggled with body image and self-love. She used to suffer from anorexia. Lazenby knew she was putting her self-image and her relationships with others in jeopardy when her mom and a couple of close friends intervened and confronted her about her problem. “It was then when I knew that I really meant a lot to the people around me,” said Lazenby. “I realized I was better than that and that I wanted to enjoy my life and not be obsessed with something so badly that it controlled everything I did.” Lazenby said it took her a long time to stop obsessing over food. “I have learned to love myself and to love food and to apply it to what I am studying.”
Dr. David J. Novicki works in the MSU Counseling Center and deals mainly with people who have eating disorders. According to Novicki, eating disorders for some people are about control. “It seems to be high-performing students with a fair amount of obsessive tendencies who want to get things right,” said Novicki. “They are very perfectionistic and feel like they have control over this one thing which is very important to them.\”
Also, sometimes eating disorders go unnoticed in families that accept it as pseudo-normal behavior. It may not be looked down upon in such an environment, especially when one of the parents is also struggling with a disorder. The book Like Mother, Like Daughter explains how eating disorders can be passed on from one generation to the next. “The mothers might recognize their daughters have a problem but won’t necessarily address it because they suffered from the same thing, or the case may be that they still stuffer from it,” said RUBI advisor and Olin Health Center dietician and nutritionist Ronda Bokram.
In some cases it may even be the mother or the parents that spark problems for their children. For example, Jill (who did not wish to reveal her last name) has struggled with her self-image for years. She said it began when she was in high school and her mom told her boys wouldn’t like her if she wasn’t skinny enough. “If I went over to a friend’s house after school she would call me and ask me if I had eaten anything. After school every day I would go straight to the gym and work out for hours.”
[tiff]Often, even coming to college can spur an eating disorder. Learning, technology and culture graduate student Tiffany Titus did not develop an eating disorder until she moved away from home. She bottled up her emotions and didn’t know how to deal with them so she turned to an eating disorder. Tiffany recently went through a treatment program at Forest View Psychiatric Hospital in Grand Rapids. “It’s not like I’m the only person or in it alone. It’s good to know that I have people to support me,” she said of her experience at Forest View. Now that she has taken these steps toward recovery, Titus said, “I definitely feel a lot better about myself. I really feel like I’m in a better place. I’ve learned so much about myself and I know there’s more to me than just an eating disorder.”
While Titus was going through her treatment program, a colleague told her she needed to “be real.” She recently got the Chinese letters for this phrase tattooed on her wrist as a way to remind her what she has gone through and what she hopes to accomplish as a result.
Tracy Smith, co-president of RUBI and a nutritional science senior, said the group\’s goal is to broaden awareness of eating disorders.
The group consists mostly of women who are dietetics majors, but they are looking for diversity of membership. “Our goal is to really get the word out so that we can get people involved whether they are a dietetics majors, male or female,” said Smith. RUBI organizes activities for the nationwide Eating Disorders Awareness Week. This year they will continue Take Back Your Body Night, an annual event with an open microphone for those affected by eating disorders to voice their feelings. “If someone is comfortable and feels safe enough to get up in front of a crowd, then it’s all worth it,” said Bokram.
They will also be handing out candy bars again this year to encourage healthy body image. The idea behind it is everyone deserves a treat and people should not count every calorie and fat gram that enters their bodies. Over the past couple years they have been dubbed as “the group that passes out the mini Twix bars” by one student who looks forward to the day each year.
Bokram said what is really important is challenging how people think about body image, media influence and healthy habits. She is available to talk with anyone who is seeking nutrition information or who just wants to open up to someone regarding any kind of eating disorder or unhealthy behavior. Bokram is there to help people understand where their problems originate and said she truly believes in the work she does.
Members of RUBI also want to educate people on how to find that inner love and respect for themselves they thought they might never find. “You have to understand where your feelings about your body come from,” said Bokram. “The feelings people experience about their body aren’t feelings about their body, they are feelings about something else going on in their life.”
While RUBI is a place people can go to talk about issues they might have, Smith said RUBI is not a support group, per se. “Yes, girls can come and talk about an issue, but we have this group because we think it’s important to educate people about the importance of understanding their own body image.”
Another part of understanding a personal self-love deficit is grasping the scope of the problem. “Based on studies and calculations, out of roughly 46,000 students at MSU, close to 3,000 have some form of an eating disorder,” said Novicki.
[back]It is also important to note that men suffer from eating disorders, but at lower numbers. Novicki works primarily with women but he said eating disorders are “not necessarily a women’s issue.” Novicki used the example of a male athlete who runs track. “There is a lot of pressure to be very cut and to beat everyone’s times. In order to do that he might eat salad and protein shakes for two weeks before his race in order to cut one second off of his time because he has dropped two pounds.” Novicki explained that this is not seen in the athlete’s eyes as an eating disorder; it’s simply what is expected of him, but it is indeed a disorder.
Marketing junior Nathan Cregeur can be spotted working out in the basement of Akers at least three times a week. “I work out because I want to,\” he said. \”Well, and because chicks dig a hard bod!”
Near the crux of the issue is the media and even broader “society,” which is often to blame for the dangerous lack of self-love and positive body image among young people. “Society has screwed us all up,” said Bokram. “The media, TV, they all trivialize the issue of eating disorders. Weight loss is envied above anything else in our society. People need to be able to love themselves.”
Of course loving yourself is an involved, but not impossible, process. It may take undoing harmful media or parental influence, talking issues out at a meeting or with a counselor, but change will ultimately come from within. “Loving yourself is not self-centered, but centering on [your]self,” said Nowicki. It allows someone to focus on the “core” of one’s self, he said.
So, perhaps Titus had the right idea with her tattoo choice. Learning to be real by accepting yourself (honeycombed thighs and all), might be the best Valentine\’s gift you can give to the real love of your life.

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The Dirtiest Time of Year

At 7:00 a.m., you lay in bed. Your eyes are swollen shut, your nose is stuffed, and your radio alarm clock is blaring Franz Ferdinand’s \”Take Me Out.\” Again. You literally fall out of bed and stumble to the bathroom where you blow your nose in a wad of toilet paper; you used all the tissues last night. You barely recognize your bloodshot eyes and puffy face when you look in the mirror. Face it, you’ve got a cold. Suck it up—a cough drop, that is; and head off to IAH.
If you want to try and beat the odds, the primary defense to protect yourself from flu season is by getting a flu vaccine. Luckily, there are clinics all over Lansing. Meijer, L&L Food Stores and Olin which all issue flu vaccines. “If you can afford [a vaccine], definitely get one,” said Keith Camann, a primary care physician at Olin Health Center.
[hand1] Secondly, remember to always, always wash your hands. Wash them when you get up in the morning. Wash them before you go to bed at night. Wash them when you get out of class and maybe before you go to class. In fact, wash them now. Camann said, “Because the cold virus is so popular in winter months it is a good idea to be in contact with people as little as possible,\” Camann said. \”This means shake people’s hands less, do not drink or eat after others and if you do find yourself in a situation where a hand shake just cannot be avoided, wash your hands as soon as possible.” Let me make this as clear as I can: germs spread faster than DPPS can issue tickets. Both are annoying, but clearly preventable.
A common health myth is that if you drink orange juice, you won’t get sick. Camann informed me that, “there have been studies that have found that whether you drink O.J. everyday or not, it has not been proven to show an increase in any one person\’s health.”
And speaking of natural remedies: you only need to turn to your hemp-wearing, organic-buying, tie-dye-loving friends to learn that staying healthy can sometimes be attributed to the assistance of alternative supplements such as garlic, parsley, and ginger just to name a few. Unlike medicines prescribed by your doctor, which are used to cure sickness, these, like other alternative supplements, are taken as a preventative measure to ensure one’s health.
Most doctors would never prescribe herbal remedies like these to a patient. This is because none of them have been proven by the FDA to treat any kind of illness or ailment. According to gourmetgarlicgardens.com, “modern allopathic physicians concentrate more on alleviating symptoms, healing and surgery than prevention of illness through better nutrition and healthier lifestyles, although that may be more the responsibility of the patient than the doctor.” Alternative drugs are most commonly used to prevent illness, not to aid in the long-term healing or treatment.
“Depending on your body and your overall diet, certain vitamins will work for you,” Better Health Store employee Sarah Berger said. Sarah showed me a cool little machine they have available for customers who are interested in finding out which herbal supplements and vitamins will work for particular preventative measures and ailments alike. A hypochondriac\’s dream! Clicking on the small option box labeled herbal remedies led me to a list of sicknesses. I then chose influenza and from there a screen showed me the supplements that are most commonly used to heighten the immune system (garlic), and produce more white blood cells (astrangalus) in order to fight off infection. Berger warned me that “the same vitamins and herbal supplements do not work for everyone.”
But of course, there are naysayers who say herbal medicine doesn’t work for anyone, who are bolstered by the fact that supplements like garlic and ginger have not been scientifically proven to improve overall health. McKinley Health Center at the University of Illinois released a statement warning people that within herbs, “Some of the agents may have beneficial effects, while some could be harmful.” Most people who do take these kinds of herbs would say they help them stay healthy and protect them from getting sick. Take for example a customer I spoke with at another local health food store. He said, “I’ve been taking a shot of parsley with a sprinkle of ginger and garlic every night for the past 40 years and I cannot tell you the last time I felt sick.” It was at this same health food store where two employees I spoke with told me that everyone on the staff takes a liquid supplement called ACF Fast Relief by Buried Treasure at the first signs of any sickness. Buried Treasure ACF (Acute Cold and Flu Formula) combines herbs and nutrients renowned for their antiviral and antibiotic qualities to create this potent fast-acting formula for the relief of symptoms during the cold and flu season.
[ket] Anthony Roland, a pharmacy technician and pharmacy student at MSU recently conducted research to find out where the most germ-infested places are. Years ago the results in a study like this would have all fingers pointing to the public pay phone. Too bad the last time I even saw a pay phone anywhere was in Bill and Ted\’s Excellent Adventure. According to Roland, “the ketchup dispenser was named the number one most popular spot for germs to be found.” I don’t know about you, but I’m sticking to ketchup packets from now on. Another hot spot is the computer labs\’ keyboards. The next time you look down at that greasy, horrifyingly shiny space bar, you can pretty much mentally quadruple the number of germs you\’d expect any place else.
Thinking of skipping that morning class to sulk in bed? According to Prescription for Herbal Healing by Phyllis A. Balch, CNC even when you do contract a cold or the beginning stages of influenza it is better to keep your body active rather than to lay around in bed. “If you don’t have a fever, it’s good to get out and take a walk.”
At the same time, try not to do anything too active. “If you’re sick, the most important thing for you to do is to stay at home. Going to class, the mall, or even using places like the public restroom when you are sick are all great ways to spread sickness,” Camann said. Along with staying at home there are a couple other useful measures to mention in terms of keeping yourself healthy. “If you have the slightest feeling that you might be sick, go to the doctor. Visiting the doctor will provide for narrowing down what exactly it is you have and then you can go from there.” Depending on if you have the flu or one of the 108 kinds of the cold you will know what medicine is best suited for your recovery.

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