Summertime Blues

[1]A tumbleweed slowly makes its way across Grand River Avenue. The bells of Beaumont Tower ring through campus without being drowned out by shouts of students making their way from class to class. Outside Espresso Royale someone kicks a hacky-sack to a friend who isn’t there. A look down M.A.C. warrants not people standing in line at the Riv, but eerily empty sidewalks.
Summertime in East Lansing sees students leaving to live at home for the summer, take internship positions, travel or move away after graduation. But just because there are less people around does not mean that the town shuts its doors completely. There is still a city and a community here that should not be forgotten.
“I’m really looking forward to summer,” Elizabeth Wilson, hospitality sophomore, said. In May, Wilson will be moving out of her dorm room in Abbot hall into an apartment at The Pines with friends. This will be her first summer in East Lansing.
“I’ll have friends around, so we will be able to hang out and find things to do,” Wilson said.
Others will be doing more than just hanging out. Micho Rutare, for example, will be using this summer to film a movie in East Lansing. Sourdough and the Seven Saints will be the second feature film by Rutare, a graduating political theory student. The film is about a group of friends who invent a religion of their own.
“The only thing I know for sure is this- I’m going to shoot this movie,” Rutare said about his post-graduation plans. “While he has some other options after receiving his degree from MSU, nothing is concrete, he said.
With many students leaving for the summer, Rutare said he’ll have “a limited pool of experience that can be relied on” for the movie. “That’s one of the trade-offs,” Rutare said, “you get people for free but it’s more difficult to find dedication.”
For the most part Rutare said he is relying on the talent of local actors. People who are involved in local theater as well as those involved with MSU theater will be enlisted to help him. “There are a lot of people with interesting ideas in East Lansing,” Rutare said.
[2]In another genre across town, the folks at (Scene) Metrospace gallery, 410 Abbot Rd., are not slowing down for the summer months. Emma Kruch from (SCENE) Metrospace said the place will be opening its Urban Show on May 19. “The show includes artists whose work incorporates \’urban\’ themes,” Kruch said, “particularly those that capture the inner city and/or metropolitan style and way of life.”
The show will feature art such as graffiti, photography, graphic design and installation pieces. The opening of the event will feature live DJs as well.
Kruch expects a large turnout for the event in May despite the absence of many students. “Our opening usually draws around 200 people and [has] been growing immensely with each new show,” Kruch said. “During the summers (SCENE) sees less students, but just as many young people, local artists and permanent residents.” Kruch said that from May to August the gallery does not cease communication with the university, but works to strengthen ties through volunteer work and extended open hours.[one]
There are plenty of other events happening throughout the summer.
The East Lansing Art Festival (May 20-21), Summer Solstice Jazz Festival (June 16-17) and the Great Lakes Folk Festival (August 11-13) will all take place this summer, drawing people statewide to East Lansing.
The Fountain Square concert series takes place every Friday night of the summer from 7:30-9 p.m. next to the Marriot hotel, as well as the Live! At Ann Street Plaza concert series every summer Saturday evening. Live! At Ann Street will be showcasing mid-Michigan Musicians.
Kruch said (SCENE) is planning a full calendar of diverse events throughout the summer. These will include “poetry open mics, music events, as well as theater events,” Kruch said.
The summer months will not be desolate around East Lansing this year. Although there may be slightly fewer rushes at Big Ten at 1:50 a.m., and more open space at the library while studying, the students here will not be able to complain of nothing to do.

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A Hipster Pilgrimage Due Southwest

In mid-March, Austin, Texas will once again see its downtown streets explode with indie rock credibility. [band1]South by Southwest Music and Media Conference (SXSW) will take over the city from March 15-19. (You may remember last year\’s festival documented by the Real World: Austin, cast.)
Scenesters’ mouths have been watering all year as they have watched the list of bands grow, reviewing their top 10 lists of CDs released last year and checking off the names as they pop up on the SXSW itinerary. Animal Collective- check. New Pornographers, check. Clap Your Hands Say Yeah!, check. What more could a hipster want?
Celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2006, the fest will feature hundreds of bands performing on more than 50 stages citywide each night, many of which are mere blocks away from one another. Since its beginning in 1987, SXSW has developed its credibility among America’s hip youth by being host to such up-and-comers as The Strokes, Beck and, um, Randy Newman.
Bands come to SXSW from all over the world: from just across the border in Mexico is Genitallica, from the UK is the Arctic Monkeys, from New Zealand is Die! Die! Die!, and from the Netherlands is Gem. They come for the sheer prominence of the event and the vast amount of promotion that can be gained from it. According to the festival’s website, “There\’s more amazing music performed and crucial business conducted in Austin over those few days than anyone who hasn\’t been to SXSW can imagine.”
Like a pilgrimage to the indie-Mecca, several bands from Michigan will be making the trip down south.
Detroit band, Thunderbirds Are Now!, will be in attendance for their second appearance at the festival. Over the past year, the band has gained a much larger fan base, was signed to French Kiss Records and toured Europe.
“SXSW last year was a launch point for us,” said frontman Ryan Allen. He said playing the festival helped give the band confidence. “Things get better and weirder as time goes on.”
The band will be playing three times during the five-day festival, including the French Kiss Records showcase and the stereogum.com party with Ted Leo and the Pharmacists and Aloha.
Allen said now that they are on the label they want to be on and have the booking agent they want to have, this year will be about getting the word out on their new album, which will come out in the fall. “We’re not going down there to be discovered,” he said, “it’s more of a press thing for us for when our record comes out.”
While Thunderbirds are performing in hopes of promoting their next record, Mt. Pleasant band Anathallo is simply excited to play the fest for their first time, not necessarily to gain any publicity.
[band2]“[There are] so many people just getting together and conferencing about music,” guitarist/vocalist Matt Joynt said.
Anathallo will be playing a showcase alongside Dashboard Confessional and Saves The Day. “I find it interesting to think of how I’d communicate in front of 3,000 people,” Joynt said. “If we do get exposure it’ll be really great.” He also pointed out that this event will be a divergence from the smaller shows the band is used to playing.
Joynt said that he enjoys both settings for different things. It is equally interesting to play in front of a small crowd at a bar and to play in front of a huge audience at a festival, he said.
There is a certain sense of camaraderie between the Michigan bands making the voyage.
“I have known those guys for so long,” Joynt said about the members of Thunderbirds Are Now! who he plans to meet up with at SXSW. “I was just this young high school kid who they gave CDs to. There’s a music community here [in Michigan] and it’s only growing.”
Michigan bands are able to shift and change, through picking up members along the way from other bands, sharing members, and touring with other Michigan bands. Thunderbirds drummer, Matt Rickle, recently toured with Anathallo as part of his other project, Javelins. The members of Anathallo are excited to meet up with him and share stories they have accrued in the past months.
Allen agreed that there is a connection with the other bands from this peninsular state. “It’s fun to hang out with somebody in a different city,” he said. He said he is excited to watch the bands play at SXSW who he has seen numerous times at the same venues in Detroit.
Other Michigan bands scheduled to play include, but are not limited to: the Holy Fire, Saturday Looks Good to Me, Blanche and The Hard Lessons.
For a comprehensive list of all the bands performing, visit www.sxsw.com. If you plan on going, don’t bother Mapquesting directions, you can just follow the full-sized vans hauling trailers with the hippest bands’ stickers. They will be on any major highway heading, well, South by Southwest.

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Riding Tall

[spare]As we rode down Grand River Avenue sitting six feet up, looming over the cars that sped past us, I couldn’t help but wonder what other people do in their spare time. Are other people’s Thursday night rituals – drinking until they are good dancers, wandering the streets looking for a partner and a party – really that interesting? How long can people talk about their strategies for playing beer-pong? I suppose we could have invested our time into something like collecting tight-fitting pink polo shirts to pop the collars. We could have done a lot of things. But sometimes, you just gotta ride.
Thursday night was ride night.
Our Thursday nights always started out in the parking lot of Ferris Park Towers, an apartment complex in Lansing, right behind the Capitol building. My friends Chase and Brian lived there, and in the storage spaces were our bikes, our nightlife, our beer-pong to an extent.
Thursdays weren’t really for mountain biking the trails or for BMXing and getting some sweet air. The thing about our bikes was, well, they were tallbikes. They’re a lot like normal bikes…only taller. The bikes consisted of two or three bike frames welded together (we had seen higher, but never made any ourselves), with an extended chain so you could pedal from your seat on the top. We had about six functional tallbikes at any given time, but usually one was having problems of some kind. Since we had more people (around 10) than tallbikes, some riders just rode their own regular bikes. It wasn’t necessarily about riding tall, just about riding.[bike]
It was always exciting for me to see new faces. We kept an extreme open-door policy; whoever wanted to ride could. This wasn’t about judging, again, it was just about riding. So we would bring people from our classes, or people who we knew would be interested.
Most people scratched their heads trying to figure out how to get up on one of the bikes. We would show them: put your right foot on the frame, then push off and bring your other foot around onto the pedal, then swing your right leg over the top so you’re sitting on it – then it’s just like a normal bike. It’s kind of confusing, I guess. You just need to do it in order to get a feel for it. It seemed so easy to us, and after a couple tries it was simple to them, too.
Getting down was usually the next thing people inquired about. We would tell them it was really easy to get down – you just jump off. It sounded like a joke, but that was the only effective way to do it.
Every trip we decided who would ride which bike. It was mostly a matter of which bike you liked the most, or which you hadn’t ridden in a while. A few people had bikes they rode regularly, but nobody was really guaranteed anything. The bikes didn’t belong to anyone, they were all community. Some nights you would end up riding the Fuji Cruiser, a two-frame-tall bike that rides terribly, but we never bothered to fix, since after all, it was ride-able. There was always the clamor of squeaking chains following that bike. That was the democracy of tallbikes.
Then we would ride.
Never sticking to a designated route, it was wherever people wanted to go that night. Usually we rode through downtown East Lansing and through campus a bit, listening and watching for bystanders reactions.
“How did you get up there?”
“What are those things?”
Pointing and laughing.
Confused stares.
Camera phones readied.

My favorite, though, was once when we were riding on Grand River. A 20-something heading to or coming from a party rolled down his window and asked, “Are you serious?”
“No, we’re just kidding,” my friend Devin shouted down to him from his bike.
“No, for real, are you serious?” We really didn’t know what kind of a response he was trying to elicit. We rode on. Through parking garages, into parks, down winding neighborhood streets – it was just about riding. Keeping discussions as we went, singing songs occasionally, we rode with a carefree attitude and an easy-going spirit.
Every couple weeks, the police would stop us on our ride. Lights flashed behind us and we would dismount to talk to the officer. It was normally the same thing: some mom with too much time on her hands would see some weird-looking bikes passing through the neighborhood, or some driver calling and saying he was freaked out by these kids on bikes that were taller than his car. After being questioned by the officer we were told to be careful; sometimes they would say we should really have better lights on those things. The officers would always end up asking the same question: So, how do you guys get up on those things? [police]
Once, though, it wasn’t an innocent run-in. It was Critical Mass, the monthly ride where individuals from across the greater Lansing community (not just the tallbikers who rode every week) come out to show support for bikes as a means of transportation. This particular ride last fall had over 100 riders, but only a few on tallbikes. We were riding down Michigan Avenue when the cops came. We were in the far right lane riding and the cop came up in the lane next to us and started swerving into ours, trying to tell us to get on the sidewalk, but ultimately only being dangerous.
He rolled down his window and told Devin (the closest one to him) we all needed to get off the street. “I don’t think that is going to happen,” Devin said. Devin didn’t seem as if he was provoking – he was just honest. He really didn’t think it was going to be possible to wrangle these bikers off the street. The officer did not appreciate his honesty.[tallbike]
The officer stopped the car, got out and proceeded to pull Devin by his belt off his tallbike. It was about a six-foot fall. Devin caught himself – we’re all used to falling off tallbikes; it happens a lot. Devin was then thrown into the back of the cop car. When a superior officer came, the first officer claimed he was just trying to keep us safe.
And so you have it, the story of the tallbike. Now, more often than not, the bikes just sit in my garage. We ride sometimes but don’t have a regular ride night anymore. If anybody wants to try it I’ll show you: you just put your right foot on the frame, then sort of push off, and then…well, you kind of have to do it to get a feel for it.

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Wishing Well

For MSU senior Rebecca DeWitt, documentaries have much more meaning than watching Michael Moore criticize the government, more than a guy eating only McDonald’s for 30 days and, yes, even more than cute penguins narrated by Morgan Freeman.
[malawi]The journalism major recently left campus to go spend a month in Africa. I was able to talk to DeWitt before she flew off the continent. She said she is working as associate producer on a project called God’s Water, a 60-minute documentary following Tom Logan and his ecumenical humanitarian organization, Marion Medical Mission (MMM). They will travel through Malawi, located in southeastern Africa, to help the villagers there establish a sustainable and safe water source. Logan and the MMM, from Marion, Ill., will be working alongside Malawians digging and installing shallow wells.
Logan’s program to build shallow wells has resulted in a disappearance of cholera, which was once a major problem in every area a shallow well was built.
“Water is so essential to helping eradicate poverty within these developing nations,” DeWitt said. “It is something that we take for granted here in America. We can safely turn on our faucet and have a glass of water without needing to boil it, or use purifying tablets, and not running the risk of getting cholera if we don’t.”
DeWitt thinks the story of Logan and the MMM is very important in relation to current events. “It’s a bigger issue than anyone imagines and here is this organization that is doing something about it,” she said. “Not throwing money at them, which is often misplaced within the government hierarchy, but going there, getting their hands dirty right beside Africans, teaching them a skill so that when they leave, when the money leaves, the wells will still work, these Africans will still have clean water.”
“An action like that is what will start to stray America from the individualistic lifestyle we lead,” said hospitality business sophomore Elizabeth Wilson. “It’s important for people to break from their day to day schedules, which lets people start thinking on a realistic level and realize there’s more going on in the outside world other than America and oil and Iraq and your own personal success.”
This project will showcase people’s ability to come together for a common cause and show different cultures can work together. This is a good message to send now, especially because of the way the United States is viewed throughout the world, said DeWitt.
“In the big scheme, helping people has a much larger and more positive effect,” Wilson said, who agrees that the message of people working together is important. “I know this is all sounding idealistic.”
The documentary is being produced by Wild Rose Pictures of East Lansing, and is affiliated with the nonprofit organization Documentary Educational Resources (DER). Their goal is to make cost-efficient media messages while using the standards of “compassion, integrity and resourcefulness” in the pictures they make. They do work with documentaries along with working in promotion and Web site development.
Mark Ducker is the president of Wild Rose and has worked in many nations worldwide, including Bangladesh and India, as well as on many media projects throughout the United States.
DeWitt became involved through an internship she held last summer. “I saw a posting for a research/production assistant intern on SpartanTrak and applied for it. Then once I started working I was given my main project, God’s Water,” said DeWitt.
DeWitt and the Wild Rose crew left on September 24, interrupting DeWitt’s senior year at MSU. “When I was first initially presented with the option to go to Africa and film for a semester, I thought, yes of course! But then reality set in and I did struggle a bit with deciding,” she said. DeWitt still hopes to graduate from MSU in the spring, but admits that spending a semester in Africa will make this difficult.
But what’s a few more months of school when given the opportunity to travel to Africa, make a documentary that, who knows, could end up on the video shelves next to good ol’ Mike Moore.

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Your Town: (SCENE) Metrospace

[scene1] On the glass facing the street, it says “SEE AND BE.” On the door a red rectangle with a white outline of an eye stares down those waiting in line for Rick’s American Cafe.
Inside, things don’t get any less cryptic. The walls are festooned with pieces of scrap paper: notes passed between lovers that appear to have been folded and unfolded several times; beginnings of poems that have been scribbled out and rewritten; elementary school photographs and a list with the names of 11 states, three of them crossed out and the phrase “bring all pills.”
And they call it art. These aren’t just random scraps thrown up on the wall – of course not, it’s art. And the viewer who “gets it” is officially licensed to look down his nose at the people who criticize it or call it garbage.
Welcome to the (SCENE) Metrospace gallery in East Lansing at 303 Abbott Road, on the corner of Abbott and Albert.
[scene2] Leslie Donaldson, the founder of (SCENE), moved to this location, along with two other friends, from the former Art Apartment gallery located above the old Tower Records in East Lansing. The space was not just a gallery but also featured art installations and performance pieces. “It got really expensive,” Donaldson said of the Art Apartment. “We paid for everything ourselves.” Thus was the establishment’s demise.
Donaldson, however, was nowhere near being done with the art scene in East Lansing. She continued to work for the East Lansing Art Festival and was given an opportunity by the city to open up a new gallery.
“It was a really surreal conversation,” she said of her dealings with the city regarding the gallery. But the wheels were in motion and Donaldson worked with several volunteers, and on April 30, 2004, the (SCENE) Metrospace was opened.
Eventually, it became too difficult for Donaldson to split her time between running (SCENE) and working with the East Lansing Art Festival. Consequently, in stepped Emma Kruch as art director to do “all the physical work,” she said.
[scene3] Metrospace tries to focus on all forms of art, from collages to performance pieces. As for the paper scraps affixed to the wall, they are part of the current exhibit at the gallery in partnership with an Ann Arbor-based magazine, FOUND!, which is a collection of readers’ “finds.”
The FOUND! Exhibit, which continues until May 22, also features photographs by Doug Coombe, as well as the Suite B Art Collective. (SCENE) Metrospace is open from 6 – 9 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 1 – 4 p.m. on Sundays.

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Spring Fling

This is you: emerging, fresh out of winter hibernation, from the depths of your cluttered room, opening up the blinds and realizing that the weather is beginning to change and you will once again be able to go out into the world and exercise your budding, collegiate social life.
Arise, oh lethargic one! The University Activities Board has prepared just the thing for you. Get ready for Sparty’s Spring Party.
[sparty] Sparty’s Spring Party has a line-up for the diverse campus to keep even the pickiest partier involved and excited. For the athletic types, there is a three-on-three basketball tournament, both a women’s bracket and an open bracket. The grand prize for the winning team in each bracket is a trip to Las Vegas. There is also an Electronic Arts’ Games March Madness Playstation 2 tournament for those finger athletes and gamers. The registration for both tournaments runs through April 13 with applications available in the Student Alumni foundation.
If you’re not one to play games, be them physical or electronic, fret not, because the festivities do not end there. There will also be a Ferris wheel, rock wall and gladiator joust, open volleyball and Frisbee, a caricaturist and Sparty’s Challenge featuring Zeke the Wonder Dog.
All of this activity might make you work up an appetite, but free food, including cotton candy and ice cream from The Parlor, will be provided.
Once evening begins to descend upon Demonstration field, Sparty’s Spring Party will be turned into an all out rock-and-roll venue. The concerts will feature the new school rock of The Donnas, the skate-park favorite The Starting Line and the indie rock heartthrobs Mae (in case you missed them last month). Also performing will be the opening band Armor for Sleep.
“The Donnas are catchy and Mae is good, so I am interested,” James Madison sophomore Casey Forquer said. He says he will most likely turn out for the concert, since he missed Mae last time they were on campus.
“I really like the UAB,” says Forquer of the party’s hosts. “It’s neat seeing all the events going on and all the good bands.”
UAB Special Events Organizer Rachel Bomeli says that UAB exists to “provide an alternative activity (to partying) for MSU students both on and off campus.” Bomeli thinks that the organization is important both to the students who are attending the events and to the students behind the scenes.
[rachel] “I love being a part of UAB,” said Bomeli, who began working as a UAB volunteer the fall of her freshman year. “I don’t really know MSU without it.”
“My favorite part of programming an event is being able to see the positive response from the students,” Bomeli said. “I think that we are beginning to really understand what it is that students want to see on campus, and we are doing a great job of providing that for them.”
Attendance for UAB events has risen over the last year, supporting Bomeli’s statement as well as her work.
Sparty’s Spring Party will be held April 16, 2005 on the Demonstration Field and IM West parking lot. The event, including the concerts, is free to students. For more information, check out www.hfs.msu.edu/uab”>www.hfs.msu.edu/uab.

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Your Town: The Offbeat

Ah… the life of the writer: months spent creating works of literary genius, idea after idea rushing through the mind to describing new creative ways articulate life, crumpled up pieces of paper filling the trashcan past the brim, the glow of the computer screen late into the night. And, at long last, the completion of great work.
Now, where to go from here?
[word] Straight to The Offbeat. The Offbeat is an East Lansing based literary collection of poetry, fiction, art, photography and nonfiction that publishes works by Michigan writers or anyone who has a current or past tie with the great mitten-shaped state. It is published once a year by the MSU Press and is run entirely by MSU undergraduates.
The idea for the magazine started five years ago when Gavin Craig, a then-MSU student, took a look at the medium for literary expression and found it not just lacking, but almost nonexistent on campus. Craig got together with some friends and started what would become The Offbeat..
“Students felt that there was not a solid literary outlet for students and people in the community,” Editor Kristen DeMay, an English senior, said. “Since then we have grown and become a solid collection of thoughts, ideas, and inspiration from across the state.”
[demay] The Offbeat works to also catch the stories that fall through the cracks and are overlooked by other publications, such as The Red Cedar Review, the only other literary magazine on campus.
“There are no age limits or submission restrictions,” DeMay said. She said the goal is to get a variety of works by a variety of writers; to hear from both established writers as well as the up-and-comers.
DeMay and her team of editors, one for fiction and one for poetry, set deadlines and collect submissions. The submissions are then reviewed anonymously, and the editors select what will be the upcoming issue. Although the deadline for the current issue has past (it was March 1), writers can still submit entries.
The Offbeat has also hosted poetry slams and plans on having another event for the spring. DeMay is optimistic and proud of the upcoming fifth volume, Collecting Glances, which she says should be out before the end of this semester.
Volume 4, Unvarnished Voices, is currently available at Schuler’s Books, SBS in East Lansing, the Student Bookstore in the International Center, Amazon.com or through the MSU press at www.msupress.msu.edu .
For more information, check out www.msu.edu/~offbeat.

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Best You’ve Never Heard: Make Believe

Indie rock cult icon Tim Kinsella has done it again. His new Chicago-based band, Make Believe, is composed of past and present members of bands such as Cap’n Jazz, Owls and Joan of Arc, all of which have gained both critical acclaim and a flock of loyal fans who have followed Kinsella and crew since their teenage years in Cap’n Jazz.
[bandpic] The four members of Make Believe are actually the 2003 touring manifestation of Joan of Arc, a band which is constantly enduring member changes. The boys – consisting of Bobby Burg on bass, Nate Kinsella on drums/wurlitzer, Sam Zurick on guitar and Kinsella on vocals – decided they wanted to move away from the mix-match, start-stop eccentricity of Joan of Arc and make a band which could sound the same live as they did on a recording, keep a consistent lineup and put in over 40 hours a week practicing.
Although every member of Make Believe came from fellow indie band Joan of Arc, the difference between the two is easily recognizable. “We distinguish between the bands just as much in terms of process as we do in terms of what the actual output or sound is,” Kinsella said. “Make Believe practices and writes songs, and we all know who does what. Joan of Arc hangs out and records piles. Maybe it could be described as Make Believe is like a sculptor that starts with nothing, and adds material to the shapes he’s already imagining. Versus Joan of Arc, which is like a sculptor that starts with a big block of material and whittles away at it and waits to see what pops out of the shape.”
In 2004, the band released a self-titled EP, as well as a limited edition two-song 7″ album on Chicago-based Flameshovel Records. According to Jesse Woghin, who, along with James Kenler, owns Flameshovel, Make Believe is “taking everything that you might expect, breaking it down into pieces and building it back up again.”
While using the same basic instruments of rock music, the band tries to delve into the most creative parts of its imagination. “It makes you feel good to be alive,” Woghin said.
[jesse] The driving, sometimes heavy, sometimes jangling guitar melodies, mixed with the crash cymbal-laden drum beats carry the album musically. What stands out, though, is Kinsella’s exercising his distinct vocal style: part melodic singing, part yelping screams and always clever lyrics. It is a sort of new form of punk rock where the musicians know more about how to play their instruments and aren’t afraid to use catchy melodies and experiment with different sounds every once in a while. It’s hard to pin down the band into one genre, with songs like “We’re All Going to Die” bringing about an aggressive side of the band, while the contrasting “Temping as a Shaman” is more upbeat.
So, what is it that inspires Make Believe to write their music? Kinsella says he is inspired by “my ears, my hands, my heartbeat, my brain, corporate fascism, consumer culture alienating the individual from him/herself, my mom, my wife, working, a big cold loft space, pondering concepts of time, what is the nature of my consciousness, etc.”
Woghin feels that Make Believe brings a different feel to the indie rock scene: “[They are] a much more visceral experience. There’s a different sort of feel, a sense of aggression, a sense of fun.”
Theatre freshman Casey Taubitz is enthusiastic about Make Believe. “I like [Joan of Arc], but it takes a while to understand and get the feel for their music because it’s more experimental,” she said. “You have to give it a while. The music isn’t really the same so much. It really grows on you.”
[cover] The band is happy with the music they are making and with the niche they have carved in the indie community. “We will continue to do what we do, because it is a good life,” Kinsella said. “We enjoy hanging out together every day, and making weird stuff, and surprising each other, and fighting each other and making each other laugh.”
“I think they would exude a lot of energy,” Taubitz said of her interest in seeing a live performance.
Make Believe is currently playing a handful of shows around the Midwest, making a stop at Mac’s Bar in Lansing on Feb. 20, along with Lee Marvin Computer Arm, Shipwrecked and Javelins. Make Believe’s self-titled EP is available at Flat, Black and Circular in East Lansing, or online at www.flameshovel.com .
The band is planning to start on their new full-length album in March with producer Steve Albini, who has worked with The Pixies, PJ Harvey and Nirvana. A tentative release has been slated for June. Simply put, “It’s going to be good,” Woghin said.

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