Olin Objections

My first experience at Olin Health Center was enough to scare any freshman away. After waiting for an hour and a half to get into the examination room, I was greeted by a nurse who asked me a million questions that did not seem even closely related to my sinus infection. “How would you rate your pain on a scale of 1-10?” she asked. With chest pain, my head throbbing and eyes watering I looked at her and dryly said, “8.” [olin]
“Um, 10 is basically dying so do you really feel that you are in that much pain?” the nurse asked. My new answer was 3, but only because I felt stupid.
The doctor came in and asked the same questions, again checking me over and finally concluding that I may have a sinus infection. Who knew? He prescribed me an antibiotic, but after a week, I was sick again with an infection caused by the first antibiotic, so they had to prescribe me a different antibiotic called Zithromax, one many students are given. Finally after about 6 weeks I was healthy again, but wasted another Olin visit because of Olin.
Staying up late to cram, having a healthy diet of coffee and anything that that is quick and cheap, college students often find themselves sick more often than ever. With quite a few bad experiences under my belt, I set out to see if other students were having such unpleasant visits.
Jared Parko, a microbiology and pre-vet junior, has strong opinions on the Center. “From the stories that I have heard I can see that they practice a different kind of medicine at Olin,” he said. “They like to pre-diagnose conditions before looking at any test results, such as, for example, saying that a girl is ‘pregnant’ when in fact she just has the common flu.”
Are students just pumped full of antibiotics, much like myself, upon complaining of symptoms of anything? Kathi Braunlich, communications and planning coordinator at Olin said that all clinics have recently been more careful about deciding whether antibiotics are necessary or not. “We try to make sure that we don’t prescribe drugs that are unnecessary, but it probably happens occasionally,” she said. “This may seem more apparent to the patient if there was a lack of communication between the medical provider and their self.”
Braunlich said that the rating your pain is a new technique and is universal throughout health care. She said this started because many patients were under treated on their discomfort level, so this pain scale was developed to help diagnose and treat patients’ discomfort better. “I understand some people say it’s overkill and are like, ‘uh, why are you asking me this?’ but it is really for their benefit.”
However, it is important to note the sheer amount of patients Olin doctors and nurses see. Olin sees about 150-200 students a day alone within the gynecology, primary care and urgent care departments, Braunlich said. She added that they see probably 300 students total, not counting pharmacy and X-ray. Flu season is in full force and Braunlich said there will be a higher demand for medical providers. The MSU physician’s health team will likely come in to help with the influx of students. In the past, Olin has seen a maximum of 500 students total in one day and it was during flu season.
With numbers like that, my bad experiences may be unrepresentative of the whole, or as a result of a high patient load. Some students had a normal visit, but perhaps not without some good luck on their part.
Finance junior Srinivas Sakamuri came in hobbling because he rolled his ankle playing basketball last year. There were several people in the waiting room but when the receptionist saw him she jumped up and got him a wheelchair. “She pushed me right into a room and the doctor came right in after,” said Sakamuri. “He gave me an air cast, pain medication, and taught me different exercises for my ankle, which I found out had ligament and tendon damage.”
Sakamuri’s girlfriend, nursing sophomore Heather Binasio, also had a good experience at Olin this year. She too was rushed ahead of the other students in the waiting room. She called first to let them know she was having back pain, and she thought she might have a collapsed rib because she had one before. “I walked in and gave the desk receptionist my name and she jumped up and put me right in a room,” said Binasio. “There was this poor girl in the waiting room holding up her hand in the air bleeding from a dog bite, but I was rushed in ahead of everyone.”
One student with a “minor” injury was not so lucky. Construction management junior Robert Rohlman was not very fortunate when he went to get his stitches out from having a mole removed over Christmas break. His doctor at home told him that all he needed to do was go in to Olin and they would take care of him. “The desk receptionist was making it difficult because she said I didn’t have the proper paperwork from my doctor at home and kept telling me that they wouldn’t be able to remove them because of this,” he said. “I got fed up and went and found a nurse who had somewhat of an idea what they were talking about – she realized I didn’t even need any paperwork to get it done.” Rohlman said even after he got into the room, the nurse asked him three times why he was there. Needless to say, he has avoided Olin since.
Despite the level of satisfaction students have with Olin, Braunlich said that Olin hires regular medical providers for full-time treatment and can prescribe medicine. The center also has physician assistants and nurse practitioners, which is the case in all other health clinics, she said.
Braunlich also said she wants students to know that Olin is here for them because they want them to be healthy for their academics. “We are ask-able,” she said. “Call, email us, use our Web page, know that we are here whether you are sick or not.”
Students, like me, who have done their time at Olin, had better start preparing for flu season by taking vitamins, washing those hands and getting more sleep to avoid the waiting room. Everyone else can wait until the last minute to go in and get medicine when they feel like dying – but of course, not a rating of 10.

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Geeks Not Freaks

Screech and Steve Urkel might have been on to something – being a dork is actually kind of fun. This explains why MSU has a variety of clubs for students who just can\’t get enough of traditionally \”dorky\” activities like quiz bowl competitions, student council or practicing magic. [magic]
The nerdiest, most sarcastic group on campus has to be MSU’s Academic Competition Club, more commonly known as quiz bowl. The game is like Jeopardy, but played with teams. The club\’s homepage reads: “Breaking News!! This website is being updated again!!! I have recently learned that this year’s elected Webmaster has not done any updating, so I have reinstated myself as Webmaster. Be prepared for a hostile takeover…If you’ve never been on a quiz bowl road trip, you need to sign up for the next one. It will be one of the best times of your life.”
Their quotes page was just as ridiculous, with pages and pages of great one-liners and inside jokes among teammates:
Quiz Bowl Practice, October 10, 2005
“I’m going to go to the bathroom and clean off whatever shit is on my pants.” ~Aren
“I’m just contemplating the advantages of staying on the floor at this moment.” ~Tara
“It’s an internship, but you’re not an intern.” ~Bob
“Nor are you a ship.” ~Aren
Their quote by Bender from The Breakfast Club, sums it all up: “So it\’s sort of social. Demented and sad, but social.”
Paul Stoetzer, international relations, political science and economics junior and vice president of the club, said they are usually a rowdy bunch in practice. Quiz bowl questions – with an extensive variety of subjects – bring up a wide range of conversation and comments (hence the randomness of their quotes page).
\”We have fun,\” said Stoetzer. \”We may be nerdy to some but we all love to play quiz bowl, and anybody who likes quiz bowl or the idea of it should come to our meetings sometime.”
They practice on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 7 – 9 p.m. in the “fishbowl” (an all-glass conference room in Abbot Hall) and occasionally compete in intercollegiate tournaments. The AAC competed Jan. 14 at a tournament at the University of Michigan, and four of the members will represent MSU at the regional College Bowl tournament in February, following a win at the intramural tournament the UAB hosted in November. They also host a high school tournament every March.
Anyone can join the organization, including undergraduate or graduate students. Most people who join played quiz bowl in high school. Quiz bowl players usually have an interest in trivia and a knowledge of a wide range of subjects such as history, literature and science.
Stoetzer said he likes quiz bowl because he has been playing since he was in ninth grade and enjoys the competition. “The people are very interesting as well, and we have a lot of fun,” he said.
Scientists have fun, too – and not just in the laboratory. In February, Lyman Briggs School will be competing against James Madison College (Nerd-Off 2006, anyone?) in a tournament including not only dodge ball, but also basketball and volleyball, for a trophy to take back to their respective school, as if the academic competition between the two colleges wasn\’t bad enough.
Lyman Briggs School of Science has approximately 1,500 students that benefit from having laboratories, classrooms, student housing, a dining hall and a convenience store all under the same roof in Holmes Hall. They also have their own student council – the Lyman Briggs School Student Advisory Council. [briggs]
The council serves as a liaison between the students and faculty members. Kelly Eggan, a biochemistry and molecular biology junior in the school and a member and contact for the council, said one of the exciting things they get to do is interview future professors that will teach in the Lyman Briggs School and throughout the rest of campus. “We are out there and on your side,\” Eggan said. \”We want your input in order to help improve the Lyman Briggs School.”
She said the best part about being in the organization is being able to connect with the faculty. \”As students it is important that we get our voice heard,\” said Eggan. \”They can help with letters of recommendation, and I know it sounds corny, but it makes me feel closer with everyone, and being in the school is like one big family.\”
You have to be a sophomore, junior or senior to join the organization, which has participated in volunteering at the Ronald McDonald House and raising $500 for hurricane relief last semester. Other projects have included volunteering on Martin Luther King, Jr., Day with Habitat for Humanity and at a health clinic.
The MSU Magicians Club does their share of community service as well. The club does private and public shows, some of which raise money for charities. Show up for one of these shows and you\’re likely to see magicians making dollar bills float, catching bubbles out of the air and pulling cards out of their mouths. The club is dedicated to the advancement of magic in the lives of magicians and the general public by helping each other practice and perform for the public. [cards]
For the past two years, the club has also performed for kids trick-or-treating on M.A.C. Avenue for the Safe Halloween night fraternities and sororities put on every year. They have also performed a show at the pediatric center of Sparrow Hospital.
“Doing shows with each other is a blast,\” said Christoher Haas, a chemical engineering junior and the club president. \”Getting to see real people\’s reactions to your work is always a natural high, especially when you absolutely blow them away. The look on a little girl\’s face when she realizes she\’s holding two sponge balls instead of one – hers, and now yours – is priceless. It\’s also a great way to get experience in performing.\”
The club meets twice a month to practice their tricks together. They break off into groups and work on whatever they need to practice. The club performs a variety of types of magic, including close-up cards, coins, mentalism, stand up manipulation and comedy magic.
Haas said anyone who can perform one trick, who really wants to learn magic, and has the endorsement of 50 percent of the current members, can join. People join the club to improve their own skills in magic, to help each other\’s performance and just to have fun. The club meets on the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month (location TBA) and can be reached by e-mail at msumagic@msu.edu if you want to have a magic show at your next event.
So, the writing is on the wall (or in the top hat, or fishbowl, or Holmes Hall) – being a dork is anything but dorky.

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Civil Disappointment

Students at the University of Wisconsin have had no problem electing a student for a seat in Madison’s city council. Numerous students have been alderpersons and represented the two student districts, even including freshman. Currently two students hold positions, but many more have in the past.
[student]Yet, here in East Lansing, a city home to another Big Ten school, students cannot seem to be able to elect one of their own to city council. Students often complain that they are not heard, but some students on campus didn’t even know there was an election, much less that a student ran.
With that said, MSU’s history is deeply political. We were a key university in the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa during the 1980s and 1990s and were very active in the civil rights movements decades before that. The legacy of MSU’s land-grant origins has left the university with activist roots.
So considering history, how could a university town- with its rich political roots and many active students- fail at electing a student to city government?
The day after the election, I met with city council candidate political theory and constitutional democracy senior John Fournier. I was shocked at his outlook on the election, but helped me change my negative attitudes toward this election. I walked into Espresso Royale where I waited for him to buy his coffee and we walked outside of his favorite place to be.
The day after the election, I met with city council candidate political theory and constitutional democracy senior John Fournier. I was shocked at his outlook on the election, but it helped me change my negative attitudes toward this election. I walked into Espresso Royale where I waited for him to buy his coffee and we walked outside of his favorite place to be.
Naturally, my first question was, “Were you disappointed in the student turnout on campus?” Right away he answered, “No not at all – the turnout was phenomenal and I hope you don’t take a negative approach to your article because that wouldn’t be right.”
Only 14 percent of East Lansing voters submitted their ballot.
Fournier explained that there were even more students that voted than was indicated, especially with those who voted at Brody. He said that the results showed that few students voted compared to how many students were registered, but there were a lot of “dead votes” which actually meant that the percentage of students that voted was considerably high. For instance, over 2,000 some students are supposedly registered at Brody, even though there are not that many students living there because many have moved out of the dorm in previous years but have not been taken off the list.
This year 38 percent of students voted from Brody, which he said was a big improvement from 19 percent last year.
Fournier added that the voter turnout for the five campus precincts was 17.8 percent, compared to last year, which was only 2 percent.
“College students do vote, you just have to earn their vote,” said Fournier. “The College Democrats did an excellent job campaigning. For the presidential election last year 86 percent registered voted and 91 percent of all students went last year. This just goes to show that there is a huge perception that college students don’t vote – it’s just not true. In fact, college students are more opinionated and willing to express their views.”
[mom]When I asked John about why he decided to run for city council this year he replied that he was involved in the local Democratic Party, he is the vice president this year for the College Democrats on campus, and after the election last year, he asked what they could do in the off year to “push the envelope.”
“I follow city politics closely, and some of my fellow College Democrats approached me about running, and so I decided to follow through,” said Fournier. “I knew I could run a strong campaign and knew a college student had a chance to win. Many people in the city are unsatisfied with the way council is run.”
And John was close to winning. He received 1,481 votes (22 percent) while the second winner, Kevin Beard received 1, 884 (28 percent).
John said he was proud about the fact that he received many of the votes not just from students but from the East Lansing residents as well.
When asked about if he was happy about the outcome of the winners, he said that he had coffee with Beard and thinks he’s a great guy and told him that he would consider his win a victory.
“He has the right idea on developments, but he does need to be stronger with students’ view. The city is poorly developed and Kevin recognizes it and wants to help students and residents,” said Fournier.
Now that John is finally out of the spotlight he plans to be heavily involved in the important upcoming election. He is glad that the attention will die down because he said it was weird seeing his picture everywhere and everyone recognizing who he is.
“Like when I walked into the store the other day and wanted to go when the cashier recognized me and started talking away like I knew who she was,” he said.
[dad]John said he hopes people learn two things from the election. “First, college students DO vote! Every candidate should invest time to campaign on campus. It is so much easier anyway because there are so many people crammed into one area and it is so important. Second, people think that there’s a huge rift – but students have more allies in the city than they realize and the city should realize that students care and follow politics. Now that students have started voting – they won’t stop, which is significantly important.”
On the day of elections, Tuesday, Nov. 8, I walked into The People’s Church on Grand River Avenue determined to make a difference and elect a student that would actually fight for what students wanted and eliminate the ban on drinking games and noise violations once and for all. After waiting eagerly for the results, my hopes were crushed.
I was also disappointed at how empty the Church was – there was only one elderly man and myself along with the people at the table helping.
But there are many possible reasons for an overall lack of voter turnout from students in East Lansing. Many students are registered at home or feel apathetic about politics.
“I don’t like to vote for candidates when I don’t know anything about them or their background because then I don’t feel like I can make an informed decision,” responded education junior Maureen Murphy. “Maybe if I were registered in East Lansing I would take the time to find out the information, but I am registered back in my hometown.”
Murphy was not the only one that seemed indifferent to the election. As I went up to different students in the Union and in my classes, I was shocked at the similar responses I was receiving. Some of my favorites were: “What election?” “When was that anyway, and who won?” “Why would it matter if I voted?” “I didn’t know a student ran, maybe I would have voted then” and the most prevalent was just that they weren’t registered.
So I asked myself why are students not motivated after there are so many issues when students need to be heard? Maybe some are afraid of getting tear gassed, I’m not sure. Or maybe we feel that one vote won’t make a difference anyway.
Political theory senior Justine Ivanoff, who is chairman for the MSU College Republicans, felt strongly about voting and was also frustrated with the results.
“I believe that voting is not only our right, but our civic duty,” she said. “We are blessed to live in a country that allows us to choose our own destiny and to disrespect the men and women who fought so hard for democracy by not voting is tragic. I was truly disappointed with the voting turnout because as college students we\’re in a unique position to really make a change in the way things are governed. I think it\’s sad that students don\’t realize the importance of their voices and, in essence, the importance of democracy.”
Randy Neice, a recent graduate from MSU was president of the MSU Democrats last year but wasn’t able to vote in East Lansing because he resides in Virginia and is registered there. However, he said that he would have voted for John Fournier and “plunked” his other vote.
“I think John Fournier and the MSU Democrats ran a great campaign, they had a more sophisticated message than even the incumbents and also seemed to have a better field plan,” said Neice.
Overall, Neice said that he was satisfied with what happened and the election results show that a student who works very hard can compete with incumbents in local politics.
Now if only enough students felt like they were agents in local politics, too. Then maybe the city would become a working democracy worthy of the university\’s history. I guess we’ll have to wait until next time to see.

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Champion for the Arts

It’s been a long time since MSU gave the arts and humanities the credit it deserves. Twenty years to be exact.
But, finally, the College of Arts and Letters will find a home in Snyder-Phillips Hall in 2007. “I am happy to see the interest in a residential college for the arts at MSU, however long it took us to generate it,” said Susan Madigan from the department of art and art history. Madigan is on the first planning committee for the College of Arts and Letters.[future]
Justin Morrill College was once dedicated to interdisciplinary arts and humanities studies and was located in Snyder-Phillips Hall. The arts college, along with Lyman Briggs and James Madison colleges, were founded in 1965 after a 75 percent increase in enrollment on campus. Then in 1979, MSU’s Board of Trustees voted to continue Briggs and Madison colleges and close Justin Morrill due to decreased enrollment and a severe fiscal crisis in 1981. They planned to close all the colleges, but a huge outcry from on and off-campus residents, as well as intervention by state leaders, prevented the closure of Briggs and Madison. Since then, MSU has been without a residential college for the arts.
Marcia Aldrich, an English professor said, “it makes sense to have areas of study in arts and letters to balance out the James Madison and Lyman Briggs colleges.” The College of Arts and Letters includes departments and schools of: art and art history; English; french, classics and Italian; history; linguistics and Germanic, Slavic, Asian & African languages; music; philosophy; religious Studies; Spanish & Portuguese; theatre and writing, rhetoric & American cultures.
The planning committee is looking for input from the campus community. “Many voices need to be heard: students, faculty, governance, administration,” Madigan said. “And that is how it should be because this measure would have a tremendous impact on the lives of many students. I personally believe that if the university chooses to go in this direction, if we make this commitment, then the funding we receive will be adequate for its needs.”
President Lou Anna Simon decided she wanted the addition of the arts and letters college to be her project during the campaign expansion of campus when she was provost. The location of the college was decided after Snyder-Phillips residence halls were next in line for renovation, and they are right next to all the buildings that hold Arts and Letters classes. “This is a fabulous project,” Madigan said. “It will be close to the arts corridor – the museum, music, art departments. This will also give students a great interdisciplinary experience.”
According to the Report of the Summer Task Force 2005 for the New Residential College/School from the Dean of the Department of Art and Art History, “The goal of the new residential college is to attract students who otherwise would not come to MSU. They are uncertain that a small liberal arts college will provide them with the faculty expertise and research opportunities of a large university, but they are wary of becoming lost at MSU. In this respect, the new residential college seeks to emulate James Madison College and Lyman Briggs School by bringing students who are well-prepared in and motivated to study the humanities in a rigorous way at a small college within a large research university.”
[p1] The new college will be built as part of the renovation plan of the Snyder-Phillips residences. Bruce Haskell, dining services coordinator, said several years ago the Department of Housing and Food Services conducted a facilities assessment that prioritized residence halls that needed renovation. Mason and then Shaw were the first two that have already been finished, and Snyder-Phillips is next. Construction will start in May 2006 and funding for the residence halls will be about $18 million, plus $16.5 million for the college. The doors will open Fall 2007 for housing and food services.
Haskell said they have decided to demolish the entire center building between Snyder-Phillips and rebuild it so they don’t have to rebuild around existing pillars. The exterior will look similar to the other residence halls in the area, like Mason and Abbot. He also said there will be a bit more space for residents, but not much.
About 1,350 residents will be the immediate beneficiaries of the renovation, Haskell said, but housing and food services also hopes it will be a draw for off-campus students on Bogue Street because of the coffee café. Also, the college will be a destination for students with classes there, as well as those who just want to experience the new marketplace.
Haskell said they have been planning this project for two to three years now, and Snyder-Phillips has taken a little longer to get to because of the magnitude of the renovation. “This is the biggest renovation I’ve seen in the 30 years of working here,” he said.
The renovations for the building include new furniture, sprinklers and paint. They will also reconstruct the[p2] community bathrooms as they were done in Shaw, with locker rooms and benches. The two food services in Snyder-Phillips will be knocked out and there will be a new marketplace in the middle. Classrooms, lecture halls and faculty offices will be built on two additional floors above this middle marketplace, and a theater in the basement for the College of Arts and Letters. The halls will be decorated with art and other pieces that contribute to the Arts and Letters College.
“The marketplace will compliment the arts corridor ambiance by incorporating vivid colors, photos, memorabilia, sculptures and banners or flags adorning the ceiling,” Haskell said. “Another neat thing is that you will be able to look down on the marketplace from the above two levels, and marketplace will cater to the above offices.”.
Plans are still in the process, but Haskell said the center building will be called the Red Cedar Marketplace and will be open from 7 a.m. – 12 a.m. There will be six different stations spread out over three wings so students will be able to look at a menu in the entrance and walk over to a station, instead of standing in lines that crowd the cafeteria.
The six different stations are: Chef’s Choice, featuring exhibition cooking with carved meats and sides; World Cuisine, featuring authentic ethnic menu items prepared to individual tastes; Soup and Salad, featuring bread bowls, entrée salads with made-to-order toppings like chicken; Dessert Emporium, featuring MSU Dairy Store ice cream and toppings; Pizza and Sub Shop, featuring fresh pizza and an assortment of breads made on site; North Campus Grill, featuring hamburgers and sandwiches that can be individualized with both hot and cold toppings.
There will also be The Barista Café Servery, which will include specialty drinks such as coffee blends, hot and cold teas and hot chocolates, along with baked goods and grab-and-go items such as salads and sandwiches. This will not be part of a meal plan, but will accept Sparty Cash.
Many people on campus have been excited about the upcoming plans for the renovation, while some students are asking why this it has taken so long. “Absolutely this is a positive thing, especially after all the positive feedback we received after renovating Shaw and Mason. It’s even more exciting because of the new food service,” said Brown.
Students that would be excited about the new college won’t be able to reap all of the benefits. Language arts junior Maureen Murphy said, “I think this is a really cool thing and I will be excited to see it once it’s done, but I don’t think it will be done by the time I graduate and I am sad I will miss out on the new classrooms for my major.”
Journalism junior Justin Kroll said, “This is a good project, but too little too late because I will already be gone by the time it’s finished.”

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Out of the Shadows

[1]When Mary was a freshman, she did what many students do during finals week – she studied in the Main Library late into the night.
Around 3 a.m., Mary finally decided to head back home to Case Hall, and she took the dimly-lit path behind the library.
Groggy from her cram session, she was startled when someone grabbed her from behind, but the surprise didn’t stop there.
He raped her.
“I didn’t even see where he came from,” said Mary, who is now a senior. “The worst part about it was that someone walked by while [he was assaulting me] and didn’t do anything.”
Mary went to the police station the next day, and the officers took her to Olin Health Center. The police never found her assailant.
Mary didn’t tell anyone for two months and covered up her depression to her friends and family. She developed mono after the incident and spent most of her time sleeping. She finally broke down and told her parents when, typically a good student, she began performing poorly in a summer semester class.
Mary said she went to therapy to cope with her emotional stress and her feelings of blame and guilt toward herself for walking alone. Now she directs some of her anger toward her assailant, but mostly toward the university because they never responded to her letters about streetlights and other issues. “Hating the guy is a lost cause and a waste of energy, because they will never find him and I will never see him again,” Mary said.
She’s had a panic disorder since the incident, and Mary said can still be jumpy and anxious, especially when approached from behind. Mary said she tries not to walk alone, and moving off-campus has really helped. She said she did have nightmares and still gets flashbacks. She also said having a supportive boyfriend at the time and for some time after really helped her.
“My advice for victims would be talking about it, because keeping it in was so much worse,” Mary said. “Telling someone from therapy made me realize it’s really healthy to talk about what happened. Journaling is also good.”
Mary wanted to share her story because she believes sexual assault is an important topic that is frequently glossed over by the university. Mary said it is important to stand up for your rights. She took a self-defense class, which she said was very empowering, and then taught one.
Mary said no one’s story of assault is exactly the same, and when it happens, different people react in different ways. When she hears stories about a woman who passed out after drinking too much and got raped, she gets angry.
“I understand it’s majority [cases when drinking is involved], but rape is never justified,” she said. “You don’t take advantage of someone.”
A junior at MSU, who wishes to remain anonymous, will be forever changed by what happened during her freshman year as well. She was at her ex-boyfriend’s friend’s house with some mutual friends, and they started to play drinking games. She made herself two mixed drinks, and when she sat down with her second drink, she blacked out. She later woke up naked next to her ex-boyfriend in a room she’d never seen before.
“I was so upset because he knew I was a virgin and that I had told him before that I didn’t want to have sex with him,” she said. “We only went out for a couple months because he was controlling, and then we just started hanging out in the summer again. I was so embarrassed and ashamed that I ran out of the house as fast as I could. Later, I am sure that he must have slipped me something because I know my limit and it is more than two drinks. I didn’t return his phone calls and haven’t talked to him since. I felt like it was my fault since I knew him and we had dated. I couldn’t believe the people I thought I was friends with let it happen.”
Another junior at MSU, who wishes to remain anonymous, was at a fraternity house with her boyfriend last year. She said she had been drinking and decided to spend the night at the house, rather than walk home. Her boyfriend left her in his friend’s room and assumed she would be fine since everyone knew she was his girlfriend.
“I woke up to my boyfriend’s friend unbuttoning my pants. I told him ‘NO’ and tried to shove him off me,” she said. “He leaned in and tried to kiss me and told me I had to because it was his birthday and I was at his party. Someone came in right then and he got off me and I crouched in the corner crying. When my boyfriend came in, I was embarrassed and didn’t want to tell him who did it. I told another brother in the house and he was kicked out. I knew it could have been a lot worse but now I don’t even trust the people I know.”
Shari Murgittroyd, the program coordinator for the MSU Sexual Assault Crisis and Safety Education Program, said rape is the most common violent crime on campus, according to the U.S. Department of Justice Publications.
Other shocking stats Murgittroyd offered are that one in four college women are victims of rape or attempted rape, and alcohol is the number one drug involved in rape cases. She also said to be aware of the circulating myths. For example, rapes don’t happen only at frat parties. Friends will assault you – the majority of victims know their attacker.
“The facts are important,” Murgittroyd said. “The majority of sexual assaults take place in the dorm or at home. [Attackers] appear as nice guys and are very likeable, but they have a plan. [They are] very unsuspecting and are the friends you hang out with. Acquaintance rape is actually what is out there. Date rape does happen, but often victims ‘know’ their attackers in the sense that it could be a friend of a friend. I don’t want women thinking that all their friends are rapists, but someone who seems like a ‘friend’ could definitely be a threat.”
Nicolle Stec, health educator at the Center for Sexual Health Promotion at Olin Health Center, advises that students make sure to get consent every step of the way when having any kind of sexual experience with someone. Alcohol is not consent; when someone is under the influence of alcohol or drugs they cannot legally give consent.
She added, “You can’t control other people, but you can control yourself. Know what you’re drinking and where it came from. Avoid open containers and punch bowls with unknown contents, even if it’s free. Know your limits. If you experienced a sexual assault, IT’S NOT YOUR FAULT.”
Stec said 3 percent of MSU students reported being threatened for sex against their will and approximately 10 cases of sexual assault are reported every year, but it is also extremely under-reported.
In 2003 there were twelve rapes reported in residence halls and eight off-campus, according to the MSU police Web site.
Murgittroyd said her advice for incoming students on campus comes from her experience working with other students and hearing what they wish they would have done. “Trust your instincts,” she said. “If the situation doesn’t feel right, get out.” She also said to be aware that date rape is out there. “Don’t abandon your friends and let them know where you are at at all times.”
Sgt. Florene McGlothian-Taylor of the MSU Department of Police and Public Safety agreed that your friends can help keep you safe. “It is important that when individuals go out to party, whether they go to a bar, sorority or fraternity, they need to return with the same group of friends,” said Taylor. “They need to be observant and watch out for each other. They shouldn’t accept drinks in case someone might slip something into it.”
Stec said to make sure students remember MSU is part of a city, just like any other city. “There are different people every year, changing the vibe on campus. Take the same precautions you would as you explore a new place.”
Murgittroyd said that the MSU Sexual Assault Crisis and Safety Education Program will be providing more education and resources to students in response to last year’s sexual assaults. They have created a Take 5 Tool Kit that will be given to incoming freshmen at residence hall meetings and there is a new interactive theater group this year, Every 5 Minutes, which will be performing skits to educate and impact sexual assault awareness on campus. This is also the program’s 25th anniversary and they will be holding a film festival and art exhibit to promote more awareness and education.
The MSU Sexual Assault Crisis and Safety Education Program’s main office is in Room 14 of the Student Services Building and their counseling service is located in the MSU Counseling Center, Room 207. Their 24-hour crisis hotline is (517) 372-6666. The MSU Women’s Resource Center has free safety booklets available at 332 Union Building.
The various resources on campus attempt to help women break their silence, and just voicing stories of sexual assault can begin the healing process for survivors. We are listening.
“Speaking out about my story is a sign to me that I’m moving on,” Mary said. “I want to be able to give someone the strength to move on because, if you don’t, it will eat you alive.”

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Where to Be

Noontimes Performances
Thursday, April 14, in the Union from noon – 1 p.m.
Enjoy free lunchtime entertainment with Donald Geml on Wednesday and Aaron Soave Thursday.
MSU Spring Women Students’ Leadership Celebration
Thursday, April 14, in Union Parlors A, B and C from 4 – 6 p.m.
Reconnect, reflect and recognize! Keynote speaker Dr. Kelly Morrison, craft project and recognition activities. Free event with food. RSVP to Women’s Resource Center at 355-1635.
Mary Kay Cosmetics Sale
Thursday, April 14, in the Union Concourse from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Amy Fix
Thursday, April 14, in the Union at 7:30 p.m.
A free concert put on by the Alliance of LBGT students at MSU.
Ron White
Thursday, April 14, in the Breslin Center at 7:30 p.m.
Blue Collar Comedy Tour comedian Ron White, also known as “Tater Salad,” has been on tour with Jeff Foxworthy, Bill Engvall and Larry the Cable Guy for three and a half years. His solo tour showcases his blunt comedy. Tickets are $30.50 or $35.50 each.
Schuler Books & Music Film Society: David Lynch’s Mulholland Drive
Thursday, April 14, at Schuler Books at 7 p.m.
This free film society discussion forum is designed to help the everyday movie watcher appreciate deeper nuances of film, facilitated by Kris Vitols, movie reviewer for www.filmchaw.com. The discussion runs one hour and the movie is not shown during the event.
Wells Hall Movies
Friday, April 15 through Sunday, April 17.
A Very Long Engagement at 7:20 and 9:40 p.m.
The Pacifier at 7:15 and 9 p.m.
Phantom of the Opera at 7 and 9:30 p.m. *Special showing in Conrad Auditorium on Friday, April 15, at 8 p.m.
Student Film Festival
Friday, April 15, through Sunday, April 17, in Wells Hall.
Friday at 7 and 9:15 p.m.
Saturday at 4, 7 and 9:15 p.m.
Sunday at 4, 7 and 9:15 p.m.
Free with student ID.
Business Etiquette Dinner
Friday, April 15, in the Union Parlors B and C from 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Which fork do I use? How do I check if there’s stuff in my teeth? Speaker Gina Engler of the Career Services & Placement office will ease your etiquette fears! Tickets are $3 in advance or $5 at the door. Lavish dinner by Spartan Signature Catering! Pick up tickets at 322 MSU Union, one per ID. Business attire required.
Sparty’s Spring Party
Saturday, April 16, in the Demonstration Field and IM Sports West parking lot from 2 – 11 p.m.
Join us for a day of free fun thanks to the following sponsors: MSU Federal Credit Union, EA Sports, STA Travel, RHA, Student Alumni Foundation, POP Entertainment, Associated Students of Michigan State University and PE.
7 p.m.: Live Music featuring The Starting Line, The Donnas, Mae and Armor for Sleep. Rain Location TBD. Also featuring a Ferris wheel, free caricatures, National Champion Sparty, MSUFCU Rock Wall, Gladiator Joust and Sparty’s challenge featuring Zeke the Wonder Dog. Free cotton candy! Free giveaways from Jones Soda Co., Jimmy Johns, The Parlor, Monster Energy drinks & more! There will be an EA Sports March Madness 2005 Video Game Tournament at 2 p.m. You must register in advance – applications in the SAF office, 3rd floor Union or online at www.msusaf.com. Rain location is in Demonstration Hall. The 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament will be in the IM West parking lot – tourney begins at 2 p.m. You must register in advance – applications in the SAF office, 3rd floor Union, or online at www.msusaf.com. Cost is $20 per team. First place: four tickets to Las Vegas with hotel. Two Divisions: Open & Women’s.
Cello Plus Chamber Music Series
Monday, April 11, through Saturday, April 16, in the Music Building Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. April 11 and 13 and 8 p.m. April 15 and 16.
A free chamber music festival featuring international performers.
4th Annual Bernard Gallin Endowed Lecture in Asian Anthropology
Friday, April 15, in 303 International Center at 3:30 p.m.
Put on by the MSU Department of Anthropology with Laurel Kendall from the American Museum of Natural History.
River North Chicago Dance Company
Friday, April 15, in the Wharton Center at 8 p.m.
Contemporary jazz dance company features an eclectic repertoire, including a work commissioned by the Wharton Center. Tickets run from $15 – 28.
Percussion Workshop
Saturday, April 16, in the Music Building Auditorium at 10:30 a.m.
Free event to honor newly appointed percussionist Gwendolyn Burgett, master class and percussion recitals.
MSU Wind Symphony and Alumni Concert Band
Sunday, April 17, in the Great Hall of the Wharton Center at 3 p.m.
Free for students.
Jazz Combos
Monday, April 18, in the Community Music School Auditorium at 7:30 p.m.
Free for students.
MSU Glee Clubs and Chamber Ensemble
Tuesday, April 19, in the Community Music School Auditorium at 7:30 p.m.
Free for students.

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Where to Be

Department of Art and Art History Master of Fine Arts Exhibition
Friday, March 25, through Sunday, April 10, in the Kresge Art Museum from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. weekdays (until 8 p.m. Thursdays) and noon – 5 p.m. weekends.
Six MFA candidates will display artwork in a variety of media.
“The Education of Thelonious Monk”
Thursday, March 31, in the Union at 6 p.m.
Free lecture by Robin D. G. Kelley, professor of anthropology, African-American Studies and jazz studies at Columbia University.
Aspire’s Annual Mic Night
Thursday, March 31, at the Kresege Art Museum from 7 – 9:30 p.m.
Sign up at 6 p.m. for this free event.
East Lansing Film Festival: “IT”
Thursday, March 31, at the East Lansing Hannah Community Center at 8 p.m.
A screening of the Clara Bow silent flapper film “IT,” with live music from Blue Dahlia. $7 for students.
Jazz Spectacular
Thursday, March 31, through Saturday, April 2, in the Union Main Lounge
Thursday: MSU Jazz Ensembles, noon – 6 p.m.; Robin D.G. Kelley Lecture, 6 – 8 p.m.
Friday: MSU Jazz Ensembles and Swing Dance with Octets I, II & III, noon – 6 p.m.
Saturday: Guest H.S. & College Ensembles, 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Free event. For more info, visit: www.music.msu.edu. In partnership with the International Association of Jazz Educators.
Little Shop of Horrors
Tuesday, March 29, through Sunday, April 3, at the Wharton Center.
7:30 p.m. Tuesday – Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday.
A musical about a loser, the girl he loves and the man-eating plant that is about to change their lives forever. Tickets run $25 – $55.
Arcade Night featuring Game Life Tour & Halo 2 Tournament
Friday, April 1, on the second floor of the Union from 9 p.m. – 1 a.m.
50-screen Game Live interactive GamePort™ system. Play top video games and special previews of new game titles from EA SPORTS™, EA SPORTS BIG™, EA GAMES™, Rockstar, Ubi Soft, Midway, the U.S. Army, THQ®, Vivendi Universal Games and more for free. Games, T-shirt and CD Giveaways. Plus Gamer’s Lounge and Live DJ. For the Halo 2 Tournament, pre-register in 322 Union. Free bowling and billiards from 9 p.m.- 1 a.m.
“The Rake’s Progress”
Friday, April 1, through Sunday, April 3, in the Fairchild Theater at 7 p.m.
Igor Stravinsky’s rarely performed 20th-century masterpiece presented by the MSU School of Music; free preview lecture will be held 45 minutes before the performance. $8 for students.
Josh Rouse Concert
Saturday, April 2, in the Union Ballroom at 7:30 p.m.
$5 student tickets at 322 Union. Only two per MSU ID. $7 public tickets at CD Warehouse and Flat, Black & Circular.
Musique 21
Monday, April 4, in the Music Building Auditorium at 7:30 p.m.
A free, new music ensemble. Show is part of the MSU Latin American Series.
Free Craft Night – “Spring Sensations”
Wednesday, April 6, in the Union Food Court from 6 – 8 p.m.
Stained glass projects & wind chimes. Guaranteed for the first 150 people.
Noontimes Performances featuring Mike Ziethlow
Wednesday, April 6, in the Union Main Lounge from noon – 1 p.m.

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Always in Vogue

With a name like Cultural Vogue, it has to be fun. On March 19, the event will kick-off Asian Pacific American Heritage month with stage performances as “one of the quintessential events that allows the Asian-American community to come together and learn about the different diverse cultures all within Asia,” Mandy Ma, nutritional science sophomore and Asian Pacific American Student Organization (APASO) treasurer, said.
Cultural Vogue is APASO’s bi-annual cultural show showcasing Asian Pacific American (APA) awareness, culture and identity through stage performance, elementary education senior Stephanie Moy, one of the coordinators for this year’s event, said.[quote]
“This event is the major kick-off event for APA Heritage Month,” Moy said. “It not only showcases APA heritage and culture, but it also invites the MSU and surrounding community into its close-knit family.”
With about 130 performers, the show’s attendance continues to grow. In 2003, Moy said about 1,000 people attended and she expects even more this year.
Cultural Vogue began in 1990, when a small group of APA students decided to display their APA culture and talents to the MSU campus. Because the show became a bi-annual event after 1991, this year will be the ninth showcase.
“Cultural Vogue is the most anticipated bi-annual event that APASO puts on, which has all of our affiliate groups showcase both a cultural dance and a modern dance,” Ma said. “People go because it is a chance to see a multitude of APA cultures through song, dance, spoken word, music and fashion all in one night.”
“Both educational and entertaining, Cultural Vogue draws both APA and non-APA community members to its stage,” she said.
Moy said she became a coordinator because she felt strongly about the educational goals of the show, as well as about its strength as a support structure for APAs on the MSU campus and in the surrounding community. Cultural Vogue, she said, pushes for a more diverse world and serves as a support structure for the APA students and audience who attend or perform by bringing together multiple APA cultures under one roof. “I loved organizing this show because I feel strongly for these causes and love the impact our show can have on the MSU and APA community,” Moy said.
[cult1] However, there usually isn’t much diversity in the audience. “More often than not, the majority of students who attend these events are APAs, so it’s like preaching to the converted,” Khanh-Van Nguyen, outreach coordinator for the Asian Studies Center at MSU, said. “But most people are so ignorant of the extensive history of APAs, even APAs themselves, anything is good.”
Nguyen said it’s important to shed light on the history of APAs in America because the community here is large, and they have contributed a great deal to this country and various issues of identity, adaptation and discrimination.
“On the one hand, it’s good to bring attention to APA during this ‘month,’ but on the other hand, and I’m sure people involved with other ‘months,’ such as Black History Month, Latin American Month and Women’s History Month, will agree: why is appreciation of these cultures relegated to just a month?” Nguyen said. “America is the ‘melting pot,’ a country made up of immigrants, yet, certain immigrants’ history are barely, if at all, taught in U.S. history courses.”
Here’s a chance to educate yourself. Seating for the show begins at 6 p.m., with a pre-show at 6:30 p.m., and the show itself begins at 9 p.m. It is free to the public and seats are first come, first serve. It’s entertainment with a cultural commitment, and that’s always in vogue.

For more information on Cultural Vogue, visit http://culturalvogue.sytes.net
For the March APASO calendar of events, visit http://www.localender.com/public/apaso.

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A Morrill Dilemma

Morrill Hall is definitely getting old.
[morrill1] It was the largest building on campus when it was first built in 1900, back when MSU was the Michigan Agricultural College. Originally called The Women’s Building, it housed the first women on campus until 1937. The hall also had gymnasiums, classrooms and cooking areas. The building eventually became known as Morrill Hall in honor of the 1862 Morrill Act, which founded land-grant institutions. A lot of history rests in that rust-red building, but its lifespan could soon be coming to a close.
On Feb. 11, the MSU Board of Trustees passed a plan 6-1 to build a $20 million, 750-spot parking ramp on Grand River Avenue right behind Morrill Hall. Signs were posted in Morrill’s current lot, which contains about 200 spaces, earlier in the month saying that it would soon be closing. The deadline has been extended to early March to allow those currently parking there to find another spot.
Concerns about the project have been raised by many students and faculty on campus because this was the first time many had even heard about the ramp plans.
Associate Professor of American history Christine Daniels said she knew there would be a parking ramp but didn’t know when. “When we [teachers] found out the project was going to start on Feb. 15, we were flabbergasted,” Daniels said.
Trustee Melanie Foster was the sole board member against the project. She didn’t find out about the building plan until early February, but attributes this to just having joined the board in January. “Apparently plans have been around for several years,” Foster said.
Foster’s main reason for her dissension was being unable to justify the cost of the project, because if they are adding 530 spaces, the cost per parking spot is $36,000. Foster was also concerned the parking ramp is going right in the historic core of campus.
“I’m not surprised that the campus reacted negatively,” Foster said. “I’m certainly disappointed it passed and I know several members from East Lansing share my opinion as well.”
One such person is Daniels, whose office is in Morrill Hall. She said it’s a beautiful building internally. “This is a very old building with a sinking foundation and is very fragile from what architects said,” Daniels said. “I am concerned that building such a large ramp right next to it will make it collapse on the inside.”
Some people on campus are taking action against the possible demolition of Morrill Hall as outlined in MSU’s 2020 Vision Plan, especially Anne Meyering, an associate professor of history, who is conducting research on Morrill Hall in regards to MSU’s 2020 Vision Plan. Studies are currently being done to determine whether it is worth it to keep Morrill around or not.
[morrill2] Dimity Palazzola, history and anthropology junior and secretary of the History Association of Michigan State (HAMS), is among those assisting Meyering. Palazzola said she’s known about the parking ramp project since last spring and is helping with research to protect Morrill. She feels the building will be left very vulnerable when the ramp is built right next to it, and that other areas of campus should be considered for a new parking ramp. She also fears the north end of campus will be losing aesthetic value. “This is supposed to be the pretty area on campus,” Palazoola said.
Other students are looking forward to more parking availability, including psychology sophomore Stephen Tietz. “There’s no parking on campus and there needs to be more,” he said. Tietz also said if the ramp is properly planned, there won’t be traffic problems on Grand River Avenue.
Daniels isn’t so sure – she’s concerned with the potential increase in traffic because she said it’s currently difficult exiting the Morrill Hall lot. “I’ve already been in a couple of near misses and people don’t always cross in the crosswalks, so what will happen when we add a larger parking structure?” Daniels said. In response to worries over the increased traffic, MSU announced on Feb. 23 that it will allow a campus entrance and exit on East Circle Drive using driveways already in existence.
The scenic value of old campus might give way to more parking spaces. The only hope is that they build something a little less obnoxious than the gigantic hamster cage across the street.

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Where to Be

Noontimes Performances Thursday, Feb. 17 in the Union main lounge from 12 – 1 p.m.
Relax and enjoy lunch entertainment.
Wednesday – Jimmy Atto
Thursday – Daniel Bednar
[tile] Craft Night – Mosaic Madness
Wednesday, Feb. 23 in the Union food court from 6 – 8 p.m.
Make mosaic tile coasters. Guaranteed for the first 150. Free event.
Summer Travel Night with M.J. from The Real World
Wednesday, Feb. 23 in the Union Parlors A, B and C at 7 p.m.
Join MTV’s Real World Philadelphia cast member and STA Travel for an evening of helpful tips and info on the benefits of travel. Photo and autograph opportunities plus prizes and giveaways! (Include photo on poster) Free event.
The Biography of Robert Louis Wynn Thursday, Feb. 17 in the Union Gold A&B at 6:30 p.m.
The Office of Diversity and Pluralism in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources will be hosting our annual African-American Heritage Month Celebration. This year, we will be honoring a 1942 African-American master’s graduate of the Animal Husbandry program, Robert L. Wynn (he passed away in 1982). He overcame great obstacles to become the first African-American Dairy Extension Specialist in the United States and do innovative work with MSU in Nigeria. It will be a creative interpretation of his life which will feature jazz music and poetry. The event is open to the MSU community. R.L. Wynn’s family, including his children and grandchildren, will also be in attendance.
Slavery to Freedom: An American Odyssey, The Fifth Annual Visiting Faculty Lecture Series Thursday, Feb. 17 at 5 p.m. in the Kellogg Center.
Sponsored by the College of Osteopathic Medicine. Rev. Dr. Jeremiah A. Wright, Jr., will be speaking on “The Emerging of African American Culture: Who Stole My Identity?”
“Politics, Nationalism and Studies at the Cambodian Past” with Miriam Stark from the University of Hawaii Thursday, Feb. 17 at the Asian Studies Center in the International Center at 4:30 p.m.
Stravinsky’s “The Rake’s Progress”: A Traditional Opera in Modern Garb Thursday, Feb. 17 in the Music Building at 12:30 p.m.
Lectureship in choral music in preparation for “The Rake’s Progress” performance April 1 – 3 at the Fairchild Theatre. Sponsored by the MSU School of Music.
Stravinsky’s “L’Histoire du Soldat and Les Noces” Thursday, Feb. 17 at the Wharton Center at 6:45 p.m.
Choral music concert preview lecture in the Wharton Center’s Grand Tier Lounge. Concert at 7:30 p.m. in the Great Hall. Tickets are $8 and $6.
Dane Cook Thursday, Feb. 17 at the MSU Auditorium at 7:30 and 10 p.m. Stand-up comedy show. Tickets are $20 and $25 for the 10 p.m. show. The 7:30 show is sold out.
Jay Teeter Thursday, Feb. 17 at the Agricultural Pavilion at 7 p.m. Country music concert presented by the Rodeo Club. $5 at the door.
MSU Wind Symphony and University Chorale Thursday, Feb. 17 at the Wharton Center at 7:30 p.m. Preview lecture by Dr. Michael Budds of the University of Missouri-Columbia will be held 45 minutes before the performance. $5 for students.
Wells Hall Movies
Friday, Feb. 18 through Sunday, Feb. 20. National Treasure at 7:00 and 9:20 p.m. Life Aquatic at 7:10 and 9:15 p.m. The Incredibles at 7:15 and 9:30 p.m. *Special showing in 102 Conrad at 8 p.m. on Friday.
Birth at 7:30 and 9:40 p.m.
The Vagina Monologues
Friday, Feb. 18 and Saturday, Feb. 19 at the Wharton Center.
Friday at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 2 and 7 p.m.
Student tickets are $8. Proceeds benefit The Ann Arbor Battered Women’s Clemency Project and TransGender Michigan.
The Annual Jazz Dinner
Friday, Feb. 18 at the Kellogg Center at 7 p.m. Sponsored by the Black Student Alliance. Contact the ORESA office for more information or to purchase tickets for this event (353-3745).
Live in Concert: Jonah Matranga, onelinedrawing
Friday, Feb. 18 in the Campus Center of the International Center from 9 p.m. – 1 a.m. Doors open at 8:30 p.m.
Free tickets available at 322 MSU Union. 2 per MSU ID. Opening acts include Chris O. of The Recital. www.jonahmatranga.com. Also free tie-dye T-shirt (make your own) for the first 350.
Spartan Stampede Rodeo Friday, Feb. 18 – Saturday, Feb. 20.
Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Barrel racing, bronco and bull riding, roping and steer wrestling. Tickets are $12 – $15 plus fees at the door, or $10 and $15 in advance.
Toby Keith and Ted Nugent Saturday, Feb. 19 at the Breslin Center at 7:30 p.m.
Tickets are $49.75 and $39.75 plus tax.
VocalEssence WITNESS Saturday, Feb. 19 at the Wharton Center at 8 p.m. Chorus will sing spirited music to pay tribute to African-Americans. Tickets are $26.
Guthrie Theater 2005 Storyteller Tour: Kevin Kling Saturday, Feb. 19 at the Wharton Center at 7:30 p.m.
Regular guest on NPR’s “All Things Considered.” Tickets are $28.
Casino Night Saturday, Feb. 19 in the Union on the 2nd Floor from 9 p.m. – 1 a.m.
Texas Holdem, Poker, Blackjack, Roulette, Craps and slot machines. Prizes include a weekend trip for two to Chicago! Enjoy the feel of Vegas with pianist Donald Geml and the MSU Magicians Club. Free event.
“Dante’s Inferno: A Video Sonato” Sunday, Feb. 20 at the Music Auditorium at 3 p.m.
Ava Ordman on trombone and Philip Sinder on tuba. Tickets are $6 for students.
Study in Commemorative Event: “Re-awakening a Black Activist Tradition: A Retrospect of the ’89 Study-in” Sunday, Feb. 20. Join us and the leaders of this historical event as we take a look back at the 1989 study-in and the current state of the MSU black student community. Contact the ORESA office (353-3745) for more information. Sponsored by the ORESA office and Black Student Alliance.
MSU Women’s Basketball Team vs. Ohio State
Sunday, Feb. 20 at the Jenison Field House at 1 p.m. Groups of 15 or more can get tickets for $3 each; however, tickets must be purchased in advance at Jenison Fieldhouse, online or by phone. Sundays are Family Fun Days, so for $20, families can get “4 seats and 4 treats” (Melting Moments Ice Cream Sandwiches).
“Woman’s Journey from Domestic Violence Victim to Survivor”
Monday, Feb. 21 – Sunday, Feb. 27
This exhibit will be on display all week in the Union Concourse. In partnership with EVE, Inc.
[jazz] Jazz Concert Tuesday, Feb. 22 at the MSU Auditorium. MSU Vocal Jazz Ensemble, conducted by Sunny Wilkinson, assistant professor of vocal jazz, will perform selections including “Sing Sing Sing,” “Come Home,” “Joy,” “You Don’t Love Me Like You Used To” and “Every Day I Have the Blues.” Free for students.
“Our Own Curtain of Darkness”
Tuesday, Feb. 22 in the 1st floor classroom in Hubbard Hall at 7 p.m.
A program focusing on suicide in the African-American community. Featuring world-renowned psychologist Dr. Alton Kirk. Sponsored by the ORESA office and the Women’s Resource Center.
Hung Cam Thai (UC Santa Barbara): “Redefining Social Worth and Mariageability Across the Vietnamese Diaspora”
Tuesday, Feb. 22 in room 303 of the International Center at 4:30 p.m.
Spring Break Safety Fair Tuesday, Feb. 22 in the Shaw Hall cafeteria from 4:45 – 6:45 p.m.
Coordinated by the MSU Women’s Resource Center.
“The Mystery of Illusion: Traditional Trompe I’Oeil Painting in America”
Tuesday, Feb. 22 in the Kresge Art Museum at 7 p.m.
Jim Tottis, curator of the Detroit Institute of Arts. Free event.
“Killer” Wednesday, Feb. 23 in Wells Hall at 7 p.m. A film in Kazakh with English subtitles; a new father must pay off a debt to a mobster (1998, 81 minutes). Put on by the Asian Studies Center.
MSU Symphony Band and Concert Band Wednesday, Feb. 23 at the Wharton Center at 7:30 p.m.
Students free.
MSU Women’s Basketball Team vs. the University of Michigan
Wednesday, Feb. 23 at 7 p.m. Groups of 15 or more can get tickets for $3 each; however, tickets must be purchased in advance at Jenison Fieldhouse, online or by phone.

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