Where To Be

Saturday, May 16th & Sunday, May 17th
10am-6pm and 10am-5pm
The East Lansing Arts Festival features arts of all kind — you’ll find pottery, photography, blown glass and more. There will be food and music too. Look for more information at www.elartfest.com.

Friday, June 19th & Saturday, June 20th
4:30-10:30pm and 3-10:30pm
The Summer Solstice Jazz Festival is FREE, and features local and national Jazz artists. Log on to www.eljazzfest.com for a performer lineup and more details.

Friday, July 17th
10:00am-2pm
Ever passed by the Entomology Department’s Bug House in 147 Natural Sciences? Here’s your chance to check out what’s inside — they’re having a free open house. For more information e-mail stinnett@msu.edu.

Friday, August 7 through Sunday, August 9
Experience folk music, dance and culture at the Great Lakes Folk Festival. Find a lineup and more information at www.greatlakesfolkfest.net.

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Where To Be

 

Peace Week

April 6th, 11 am at The Rock

Kick off Peace Week (sponsored by the Peace Over Prejudice Campaign) by getting some info and free giveaways Monday. Keep attending events throughout the week- the biggest event will be the Tunnel of Oppression- an interactive theatrical event with performances at 6:30, 7:15, and 8pm in the Union Gold Rooms.

Dice and Ice

April 3rd, 9 pm at Munn Ice Arena

Come play your favorite casino games to compete for awesome prizes, and don’t forget to take a break from gambling to ice skate for free! This UAB event is an annual favorite.

Provost Forum

April 8th, 4 pm; room 300 of Human Ecology

Here’s your chance to directly question Provost Kim Wilcox on MSU’s reactions and plans for the challenging economic times. Staff, students, and faculty are all invited!

SADA Fashion Show

April 18th, 8 pm in the Lansing Center

Come view the show of the Student Apparel and Design Association (SADA). It will feature runway looks from more that 20 student designers, and continue the annual tradition of displaying student design talent.

The Who’s “Tommy”

Various times- look here for more info.

Like listening to The Who? Up for a play about a pinball wizard? Theater majors teamed up with the telecommunications department for an amazingly technical on-stage experience. Students see the play for $15!

 

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Where To Be

Peace Week
April 6th, 11 am at The Rock
Kick off Peace Week (sponsored by the Peace Over Prejudice Campaign) by getting some info and free giveaways Monday. Keep attending events throughout the week- the biggest event will be the Tunnel of Oppression- an interactive theatrical event with performances at 6:30, 7:15, and 8pm in the Union Gold Rooms.

Dice and Ice
April 3rd, 9 pm at Munn Ice Arena
Come play your favorite casino games to compete for awesome prizes, and don’t forget to take a break from gambling to ice skate for free! This UAB event is an annual favorite.

Provost Forum
April 8th, 4 pm; room 300 of Human Ecology
Here’s your chance to directly question Provost Kim Wilcox on MSU’s reactions and plans for the challenging economic times. Staff, students, and faculty are all invited!

SADA Fashion Show
April 18th, 8 pm in the Lansing Center
Come view the show of the Student Apparel and Design Association (SADA). It will feature runway looks from more that 20 student designers, and continue the annual tradition of displaying student design talent.

The Who’s “Tommy”
Various times- look here for more info.
Like listening to The Who? Up for a play about a pinball wizard? Theater majors teamed up with the telecommunications department for an amazingly technical on-stage experience. Students see the play for $15!

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Where To Be

“The what lecture series?”

See a speaker this month. We go to a university where hundreds of renowned experts from hundreds of random subject areas are kind enough to give lectures for free all the time. When was the last time you attended a lecture you didn’t have to pay for? Here’s the most interesting-looking lectures taking place in March…

March 2
Learn about Jewish art. Henry Sapoznik, a visiting professor from University of Wisconsin-Madison will talk about Jewish Art and Music from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Green Room of the MSU Union.

March 18
Sister Helen Prejean, author of Dead Man Walking will talk about her work as a human rights and anti-capital punishment activist. This event will take place in Big Ten Room A of the Kellogg Center at 7:30 p.m.

March 19
Ever have a burning desire to know what telescopes in the future will be capable of? See a talk by MSU professor Jack Baldwin at the Abrams Planetarium at 7:30 p.m. to find out.

March 24
Come see a speech by Ariel Levy, author of Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women & The Rise of Raunch Culture. It’s at 6:30 pm in the Union in Gold Room B.

March 27
It isn’t every day you hear about the role of invasive species of crayfish in small lake food webs. Hear Brian Roth speak on the subject at room 237 of the Kellogg Biological Station at 11 a.m.

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Where To Be

Learn About Climate Change, February 2
Come enjoy a “teach-in” (remind anybody else of 1968?) about a hot topic. This is part of an effort to help people understand what’s going on with Global Warming during Obama’s first 100 days in office, and will be held from 11am-6pm in the Communication Arts and Sciences Building. For a schedule of events, visit this Web site.

Lil’ Sibs Weekend, February 6-9
May as well take advantage of the weekend to make a Spartan of ’em. Activities include a scavenger hunt, meeting Sparty, and a free concert. I’m going to bribe my sister to come even though she’s 15. She’s going to play life-sized Candy Land and like it.

See Lupe Fiasco, February 12; MSU Auditorium, 8pm
Sweet rapper right here at MSU for $15? Sounds like a good deal, even for a poor college student. Go to the Wharton Center (or their Web site) for tickets!

Celebrate Black History Month, February 12
Enjoy some soul food and music that’s good for your soul all at once at the Brody Cafeteria from 5-8pm. Student groups will be performing, it’s free, and it’s a good way to commemorate Black History Month!

Find a Summer Job, February 18th
If you’re like me, you’re looking for a way to spend this summer doing something more related to your future than lifeguarding. Luckily there’s an event for just such a purpose… the summer internship/career fair is from 5-8pm in the Kellogg Center. Bring some resumes and get crackin’!

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Where To Be

Online textbook deals may have started out as the college equivalent to a wives’ tale, but in 2009 it’s easier than ever to find books online. By cutting out (or at least reducing the role of) the middle man, student-to-student sales benefit both parties. That said, I buy as many books as I can online, and these are the websites I find most helpful:
1) www.allmsu.edu. If you’re new to the site you’ll have to quickly create a password, but it’s the most relevant to what you’re looking for, since all the books come from MSU students. It’s also the best way to get your text on time; meeting up with somebody across campus is way more effective than waiting for you book to ship from, say, California.
2) Facebook Marketplace. You’re on FB for three hours a day anyway, click through some textbook listings. Like AllMSU, they will be from people you can meet up with. Also, a lot of the ads have an “Or Best Offer” clause, so if you’re down for bartering this might be for you.
3) www.half.com. This is Ebay’s answer to the demand for online textbooks. Unlike on Ebay, there’s no bidding involved. It’s easy to search (and sell, if you’re interested). You do have to pay shipping, and I’m sure Ebay gets some kind of cut. Nonetheless, probably less expensive than walking into a bookstore and buying a new copy.
4) Good Ole www.amazon.com. They have a pretty good textbook selection (well, a good everything selection really). Just make sure you’re not paying more than you would in a store when you take shipping into account.
5) www.google.com/products. Google does everything well. Type in a really specific textbook name and see what pops up for you. You can sort by price or relevance, but check to make sure the edition is right, because something like every textbook ever made pops up.
Anyway, I guess that’s all of the online book browsing advice I have. Don’t forget to comparison shop at the real bookstores (or their websites). Good luck!

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December 1: AIDS Candlelight Vigil
December 1 is World AIDS Day. Join representatives from the Olin Health Center at the rock at 6:30 p.m. to honor the millions of lives lost to this disease.
December 3: ALS Fundraiser
Eat for a cause! Come to Noodles &Co on December 3rd and 25% of the proceeds from your meal will go toward helping people cope with ALS (also referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease).
December 1 – 31: Political Cartoons of the Gilded Age
A free exhibit at the MSU Museum’s West Gallery features some of the nation’s first political cartoons, many from the infamous Puck Magazine. Take a break from studying to come laugh at cartoonists’ old-fashioned depictions of government greed, graft, and fraud.
December 9 – 12: GREASE
The Wharton Center brings students GREASE, the award-winning musical of 1950’s splendor. Tickets are $25 for students, but it is a Broadway-quality show right on campus. Buy tickets online at www.whartoncenter.com.

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Where to Be

November 4th
GET OUT AND VOTE! Confused on where to do that? Type your information into the Michigan Secretary of State website Michigan Secretary of State Web site to find out where you are registered and what your polling location is.
November 6th
Come to the rock between 2 and 5 p.m. to hear Arabic poetry recitation, learn about Arabic calligraphy and eat some regional treats! This event is part of Islam Awareness Week. More information and other fun events can be found at http://www.msamsu.com/.
November 13th
Undecided? Come to the Undergraduate University Division’s “Marathon of Majors” from 5 to 7 p.m. on the first floor of Bessey Hall.
November 23rd
Come to Abrams Planetarium at 4 p.m. to hear Baxter Black, a spoken-word poet and a cowboy, speak about his experiences with the stars. Students with an ID get in for $2.50. For more information contact Mary Gowans at gowans@msu.edu.

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Seniors Still Here

[doortag]Dorms, residence halls, university housing. No matter what you call the housing options on campus, they suddenly become uncool and unpopular after you are here for a couple years.
“I always feel like I need to clarify why I’m living in the dorms. Otherwise I feel like I kind of get looked at weird.” said Nia Orvis, an advertising senior who, as a second-year resident mentor, still lives in the residence halls.
Of course, there are advantages to living off campus. Geology senior Tim Matthews said that living off campus is liberating. “There’s something about having a place to yourself where you can look around and say, ‘OK, this is my place,’ and not feel like it’s just a piece of property lent to you by this giant university,” he said.[goldblatt1]
But for some, the convenience of “living on” outweighs the negatives. “It’s a lot closer to classes, so you don’t have to worry about travel time,” said Gary Koskinen, a senior who, after living in an apartment for his junior year, moved back on campus to work as a resident mentor. “When I lived in an apartment it was a half-hour bus ride to every class.”
“I think there are advantages even for them [seniors], at that stage in their college career,” said Paul Goldblatt, Director of Residence Life. “Seniors tend to live in certain places. Shaw is a very popular place, and then there’s the northern part of campus. Shaw is clear because it’s so centrally located. I think students really like that it’s right there in the middle of everything. And then north campus is in terms of location and the attractiveness of it – the buildings are beautiful.”
There are even academic advantages to dorm life. “The seniors who live on campus have higher GPAs than those that live off campus. You have access to support and resources,” Goldblatt said. [deskgirl]
However, there are some things like cooking and paying rent that students should leave college knowing, but that are not necessarily recreated on campus. “Before I got the mentor job I considered getting an apartment. I really feel like it’s a good learning experience. You get to have experience with having to pay rent and having to buy groceries. It isn’t always the most fun but a necessary thing you have to learn to do before you get to the world,” Orvis said.
“I think there are plenty of opportunities on campus to learn how to cook – there are apartments that come with kitchenettes or kitchens down the hall,” Matthews said. “But there’s a lot to be said for learning things financially – paying rent, not going through the university with all of your money. It’s a lot more learning fiscal responsibility.” [dorm3]
Matthews is right – there are a couple of ways to cook on campus. Holden added floor kitchens, and Williams Hall is popular for having residents cook their own food. Students living in Williams can even choose not to have meal plans with the university, so they do have to do things like buy groceries and cook. “I think one of the reasons [upperclassmen] live over there is they have the option of making their own food,” Orvis said.
But what makes dorms morph from hip, parent-free places to apparently lame dwellings toward the end of one’s education? For Matthews, a lot of it was the resident mentors. Now that he lives off-campus, “It’s like you’re off the little playground, and nobody’s going to blow their whistle at you if you’re going the wrong way up the slide.” In other words, you’re free to make your own mistakes, an arguably essential part of growing up.
Goldblatt is quick to point out that MSU’s resident mentors are actually tolerated more than RAs nationwide. “You know, it’s interesting. For students who lived off campus and cited rules and regulations as the reason they moved off campus, we are much lower than the national average,” he said.
In Orvis’s opinion, the problem lies more in the psychology involved in what people perceive as signs of maturation. “People know that as a freshman you have to live on campus, so they want everybody to know ‘I’ve been here for a while, I can live in an apartment.’ And having an apartment makes you seem older, more mature,” Orvis said. And Orvis made the point that requiring freshman to live on campus might not be as necessary as the university seems to think. “I think even if you weren’t required to live in the dorms, people would probably do it anyway. Because living in the dorms is that classic college experience that people want, at least for one year. I think people would still go through that,” Orvis said. [goldblatt2]
But from a business standpoint, it is advantageous to Housing and Food Services (HFS) to have both freshmen and upperclassmen “living on.” “The residence hall system is run completely on room and board rates. It gets no money from the state, no money from the university. So the more people who live off campus, the more loss of revenue,” Goldblatt said. And obviously, they can’t fill up every residence hall with just the freshmen required to live there.
Because of this, HFS does try to attract older students. Owen Hall is not just for graduates. It is for students 21 and over, and residents are free to host alcoholic events in the dorm. In addition, there is always the option of a university-owned apartment. These apartments still have support staff and programming but not a person in charge of keeping you in line. “I think my hope is in the future that we will have more apartments. If we can create the off-campus experience on campus, that’s the best of both worlds. And you’re dealing with cooking, all the issues that come with living in an apartment, but you’re on campus,” Goldblatt said. [dorm4]
Obviously, the first concern is what works for the individual. Some people are dying to get off campus, but there are seniors (and even graduate students) who live in a dorm and love it. But the general stigma surrounding whether or not a senior lives on campus is something that should disappear. Just because a senior lives on campus now may not mean they have lived there all four years, and it’s rarely the case that a senior just cannot find anybody to live with. In most cases the seniors that “live on” are consciously making the decision that they see as best. Immature? Think again.

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Where To Be

Enjoy a political edition of this month’s Where to Be.

Obama’s Change We Need Rally
Oct. 2nd
Rally right here at MSU with the Democratic contenders for our nation’s highest office. It is on Adams Field and the gates open at 11:30 a.m. The program will begin at 2:30 p.m.
RSVP at http://my.barackobama.com/page/invite/lansingchange.

Register to Vote
The Michigan Secretary of State’s registration van is coming on the last day to register- Monday Oct. 6th! They will be at the Rock from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m., so stop by and update your registration in a non-partisan setting.

Watch the Debates
The next one is Tuesday, Oct. 7th at 9pm and will feature a Biden versus Palin face-off. MSU Journalism students will be “liveblogging”- you can watch students offer commentary on the candidates’ performances and share your own ideas via chat at www.mogulus.com/bloggingtheelection. The last debate is Oct. 15th, so tune in!

Get Fired Up Over Coffee
On Wednesday Oct. 8th MSU Coffee Club is hosting its annual Javapalooza at 7pm at (SCENE) Metrospace. Admission is $7, and includes coffee and snacks plus free mugs for the first 20 people. Bands Ringo Star, Irwin Vega, and Ante Up will play.

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